June 2019 News

In this edition: upcoming the June 10 Swedish immigrant presentation by Ross Fogelquist (at Nordia House), and the June 29 Grand Opening of the expanded Garden Home Community Library.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories, and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. Contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com.

Upcoming Events

Join us Monday, June 10 at 6:30 PM at the Nordia House at 8800 SW Oleson Rd for an evening learning about the Swedish immigrant experience in Oregon 1850-1950. Review the new displays at Nordia House, enjoy a slide show presentation by Ross Fogelquist, tour his Fogelbo home full of Scandinavian history, and share cookies on the deck.

Attend the The Garden Home Community Library’s official Grand Opening to celebrate the newly renovated library expansion, Saturday, June 29th from 10am to 2pm.

Recent News

On April 8, we hosted a presentation by John K. Lim and Jenny Kim of the Korean Society of Oregon. They presented the story of the very busy Korean Society of Oregon. This Society purchased the former Garden Home United Methodist Church property on SW 81st avenue off of SW Garden Home Road, after the Church closed in 1994. Several groups who use the building include the Society, the Korean language school for children on Fridays and Saturdays and the older Koreans for social and cultural activities. These groups are identified in the Korean language at the front door. They gifted us with a wonderful book relating the 50 years of the Korean Society of Oregon. This book will be on display in our historical display in the new Library expansion this spring. John K. Lim served for 5 terms in the Oregon Legislature, both as a Representative and a Senator.

On April 18, we hosted a presentation of the early history of the Garden Home Post Office at Garden Home Growlers. Stan Houseman showed photos of the Garden Home Post Office from its founding in 1882 to its present day location inside the Garden Home Marketplace. We’d like to thank Adam Martinez of Garden Home Growlers for providing a new home to the historic Garden Home Post Office safe.

Thanks to our Garden Home Gardeners for the daffodil display up and down SW Oleson Road. Most of these daffodils were originally planted by this volunteer group in 2008 to celebrate the remodel of SW Oleson Road. Watch for more color in the medians that the Gardeners care for.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Dean Erwin Day obituary

Dean Erwin Day, November 28, 1936 to March 6, 2019

Dean Erwin Day passed away on March 6th at 82. He was born November 28, 1936, in Kelso, Washington, a few months later he moved to Salem, Oregon. In first grade, he moved to Garden Home. He graduated from Beaverton High School in 1955 and soon after joined the Navy as an Aviation Electrician for a 20-year career, with the last 10 years teaching electronics. After retiring from the Navy, he attended PCC at Rock Creek campus and earned an Associate’s Degree in Vocational Education. He then taught a few basic electronic classes at PCC. In 1976, he joined Intel as a line maintenance supervisor and moved to San Jose, California in 1980. In 1986, he bought an electrical lighting service company with a partner and returned home to Oregon in 1995. He worked at Nike in their manufacturing plant for 5 years before retiring at 65. He lived in Hillsboro until October 2018, then moved to Keizer, Oregon.

Dean played fast pitch softball and made the All Navy team four times as a pitcher. He continued to pitch after the Navy with/for his ‘younger’ brother, Bob, in the Lake Oswego (for Wanker’s Tavern) Fast pitch League. He enjoyed watching baseball, basketball and football on TV. He was an avid wood worker, who said he was in the Top 10 of having the most woodworking equipment. He enjoyed wine tasting, reading, crossword puzzles and no one was allowed to interrupt him while Jeopardy was on. He sang Lead for a few years with Tualatin Valley Harmony Masters, a barbershop chorus, in Hillsboro. He was much loved for his wonderful sense of humor and having had an eventful life, he always had a story to tell.

Dean is survived by his wife Janiece of 38 years, his children Greg Day (wife Heidi), Weatherford, Texas, Janice Corliss (husband Bert Corliss) and Michael Day of Brigman, Michigan, 2 step-children Robert Becker (wife Kristi), Keizer, Oregon and Brian Becker (wife Nichole), Sunnyvale, California and eight grandchildren Carlen Day Morgan, Matthew Day, Jackson Day, Emilie Becker, Nathaniel Becker, Jeremy Becker, Mia-Faith Becker and Nicholas Becker along with his brother Bob Day (wife Delia) of Woodburn, Oregon.

A private family service will be held at Willamette National in Portland, Oregon. His “Celebration of Life” will be held on Friday, May 17th at 4:00pm at the Woodburn Estates and Golf Club, 1776 Country Club Rd, Woodburn, Oregon in the Dining Hall, go to the Office door and turn right to the Dining Hall.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Diabetes Foundation or National Kidney Foundation.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

April 2019 News

In this edition: upcoming April 8 Korean Society presentation (at Red Center), April 18 Historic Post Office Safe presentation (at Garden Home Growlers).

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories, and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. Contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com.

Upcoming Events

Join us Monday, April 8 at 6:30 PM at the Garden Home Recreation Center for a presentation by the Korean Society. John K. Lim and Jenny Kim will present the story of the very busy Korean Society of Oregon. This Society purchased the former Garden Home United Methodist Church property on SW 81st avenue off of SW Garden Home Road, after the Church closed in 1994. Several groups who use the building include the Society, the Korean language school for children on Fridays and Saturdays and the older Koreans for social and cultural activities.  These groups are identified in the Korean language at the front door. They have gifted us with a wonderful book relating the 50 years of the Korean Society of Oregon. This book will be on display in our historical display in the new Library expansion this spring. John K. Lim served for 5 terms in the Oregon Legislature, both as a Representative and a Senator. Our Korean war veterans are honored by this Society.


Join us Thursday, April 18 at 6:30 PM at Garden Home Growlers (inside Garden Home Market Place) for a presenation about early Garden Home history and the historic Post Office safe that we recently moved into their space.

Recent News

Rep. Schouten February 2019 newsletter excerpt

Rep. Schouten February 2019 newsletter excerpt

Oregon State Representative Sheri Schouten featured the Garden Home History Project in her February newsletter. Thank you Rep. Schouten for your interest in our project!

Garden Home History was offered the historic safe from the old Garden Home Post Office location prior to the Post Office moving to its current location inside the Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway). Huge, ugly, locked, no combination, 500+ pound block of painted iron, about 2 foot square and 3 foot tall on old steel wheels. We felt an obligation to find a home for this piece of our history.

Adam Martinez from the Garden Home Growlers offered a home for it, but we were at a loss on how to move a hunk of iron weighing over 500 pounds. Denny Parent answered a Nextdoor post from Stan. Denny owns a large crane truck! Tom and Stan coordinated the plan, Susan and I took photos, and my grandson Eric helped. We were all amazed with the arrival of this huge beautiful truck and our hero Denny Parent who managed the whole process perfectly. Friend Brian Fuller arrives at the store for broccoli, lends muscle to the final push and dashed back to his car for his floorjack, the last perfect tool to complete the job.

Come visit the safe at Garden Home Growlers, and have a cool one from the Growler!

We’d like to also thank Mike Babbitt of Garden Home Market Place and Shelly Bagley of the Old Market Pub & Brewery for their interest and support for finding a home for this historic Garden Home artifact.

On January 8, Reenactors from historical groups in Beaverton, Forest Grove, and Garden Home introduced the Denney family, A.T. “God Almighty” Smith, and Margaret Simmons from Patton Valley (the mother of Polly Philena Oleson). PatsyVandeVenter and Elaine Shreve presented as Margaret Simmons and her granddaughter Reta Welch. View the photos and read more about the event.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

George Nobel Babbitt and Mae Babbitt obituary

George Nobel Babbitt, February 6, 1926 to December 19, 2018
Mae Babbitt, December 11, 1921 to May 11, 2016

George Babbitt, a plumber in S.W. Portland for 60 years, born in Bell, California; the oldest of four children. He moved to Oregon after WWII.

He married Mae Babbitt in April 1948. Mae was born in December 1921 in Norwood, New York to a Dairy farmer.

Together they raised four children, sons, Robert and Steven and daughters, Twanda and Carole. Mae was his office manager for the plumbing business. They were married 68 years.

George and Mae were preceded by both sets of parents; his sister, LaVonne; her seven siblings; son, Robert; and daughter, Twanda.

George’s memorial planned for later. Please sign the online guest book at www.oregonlive.com/obits

Click here to read our article about George and Mae Babbit.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged | Leave a comment

January 30, 2019 Move of the Historic Post Office Safe

Garden Home History was offered the historic safe from the old Garden Home Post Office location prior to the Post Office moving to its current location inside the Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway). Huge, ugly, locked, no combination, 500+ pound block of painted iron, about 2 foot square and 3 foot tall on old steel wheels. We felt an obligation to find a home for this piece of our history.

Adam Martinez from the Garden Home Growlers offered a home for it, but we were at a loss on how to move a hunk of iron weighing over 500 pounds. Denny Parent answered a Nextdoor post from Stan. Denny owns a large crane truck! Tom and Stan coordinated the plan, Susan and I took photos, and my grandson Eric helped. We were all amazed with the arrival of this huge beautiful truck and our hero Denny Parent who managed the whole process perfectly. Friend Brian Fuller arrives at the store for broccoli, lends muscle to the final push and dashed back to his car for his floorjack, the last perfect tool to complete the job.

Come visit the safe at Garden Home Growlers, and have a cool one from the Growler!

We’d like to also thank Mike Babbitt of Garden Home Market Place and Shelly Bagley of the Old Market Pub & Brewery for their interest and support for finding a home for this historic Garden Home artifact.

Posted in Events, News | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

February 2019 News

In this edition: March 11 presentation on website, moving the old post office safe, Rep. Schouten newsletter, and historical re-enactment events.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories, and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. Contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com.

Upcoming Events

Join us for our next meeting March 11, 6:30PM at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We will begin with a 30-minute presentation by Tom Shreve exploring our website and the variety of online resources available to research history in Garden Home.

Join the Oregon Historical Society on February 14, 10AM to 5PM to celebrate 160th Oregon Statehood Day and the the Grand Opening of Experience Oregon. Free. Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave, Portland, Oregon 97205. More information about the event.

Join us Monday, February 11 at 6:30 PM for a brief reenactment of the life of Polly Philena Oleson’s mother, Margaret Simmons Patton Mills Welch. We’ll all join in portraying the history of her trek on the Oregon Trail, her several marriages and numerous children. She lived an inspirational life as a pioneer in the late 1800s in the Beaverton area, Cornelius, Patton Valley and finally in Ridgefield, Washington. And, magically, one of her tasty garden treats will appear. All are welcome to attend this program.

Everyone is invited to stay for our monthly board meeting when we will review our list of “secret” Garden Home treasures and planning our next step! Also regular business, nominations committee, and plans for the year.

Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road, Portland, OR 97223. Questions: 503-246-5879.

Recent News

Rep. Schouten February 2019 newsletter excerpt

Rep. Schouten February 2019 newsletter excerpt

Oregon State Representative Sheri Schouten featured the Garden Home History Project in her February newsletter. Thank you Rep. Schouten for your interest in our project!

Garden Home History was offered the historic safe from the old Garden Home Post Office location prior to the Post Office moving to its current location inside the Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway). Huge, ugly, locked, no combination, 500+ pound block of painted iron, about 2 foot square and 3 foot tall on old steel wheels. We felt an obligation to find a home for this piece of our history.

Adam Martinez from the Garden Home Growlers offered a home for it, but we were at a loss on how to move a hunk of iron weighing over 500 pounds. Denny Parent answered a Nextdoor post from Stan. Denny owns a large crane truck! Tom and Stan coordinated the plan, Susan and I took photos, and my grandson Eric helped. We were all amazed with the arrival of this huge beautiful truck and our hero Denny Parent who managed the whole process perfectly. Friend Brian Fuller arrives at the store for broccoli, lends muscle to the final push and dashed back to his car for his floorjack, the last perfect tool to complete the job.

Come visit the safe at Garden Home Growlers, and have a cool one from the Growler!

We’d like to also thank Mike Babbitt of Garden Home Market Place and Shelly Bagley of the Old Market Pub & Brewery for their interest and support for finding a home for this historic Garden Home artifact.

On January 8, Reenactors from historical groups in Beaverton, Forest Grove, and Garden Home introduced the Denney family, A.T. “God Almighty” Smith, and Margaret Simmons from Patton Valley (the mother of Polly Philena Oleson). PatsyVandeVenter and Elaine Shreve presented as Margaret Simmons and her granddaughter Reta Welch. View the photos and read more about the event.

Thanks for stopping by our booth at the 34th annual Holiday Bazaar at the Garden Home Recreation Center on Saturday, December 1st. There were over 100 local art and craft vendors, live entertainment, holiday music, pancake breakfast and more!

We held a Veteran’s Day event on Saturday, November 10 at the Garden Home Recreation Center, with photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha Post 104, American Legion presented the colors. Sig Unander presented the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat. Click here to read more about the event and to view the event photos.

Visit the spooky and humorous Garden Home Graveyard Halloween display on SW 82nd Ave by Kirstin Lurtz!

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

January 8, 2019 – Historical Reenactment

The Beaverton Historical Society invited us to participate with them and the Friends of Historic Forest Grove for a reenactment of historical figures from our histories. Patsy VandeVenter and Elaine Shreve presented a portion of the history of Margaret Simmons Patton Mills Welch, as written in her family history on our website. Margaret came out on the Oregon Trail in 1853, with dying oxen and Indian peas providing much needed food.  Her first marriage to John Patton ended tragically followed by two more marriages ending badly.  She lived in Patton Valley, Beaverton, Cornelius, Palouse country in Washington and finally in the Ridgefield area with a son, one of her nine children.

Marcus Hazelett from Forest Grove presented the story of Alvin T. “God Almighty” Smith. A.T. “God Almighty” Smith was an early pioneer that settled in the area now known as Forest Grove.

Judy and Dan Donovan presented the story of her Denney relatives Berilla and Thomas Denney. Thanks to Judy for setting this up and to the good audience enjoying the presentations.

Posted in Events, News | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

January 2019 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Hello Garden Home Friends – Happy New Year! For something really different, please join us as we meet some visitors from long ago! Reenactors from historical groups in Beaverton, Forest Grove, and Garden Home will introduce the Denney family, A.T. “God Almighty” Smith, and Margaret Simmons from Patton Valley (the mother of Polly Philena Oleson). A reenactment and fascinating stories! PatsyVandeVenter and Elaine Shreve will present as Margaret Simmons and her granddaughter Reta Welch.

Join us next Tuesday, January 8 at the Elsie Stuhr Center, 5550 SW Hall Blvd, Beaverton, OR 97005.  Tualatin HIlls Park & Recreation District.  7:00-8:30 pm. Doors open at 6:45 pm, $3 donation suggested.

News

Thanks for stopping by our booth at the 34th annual Holiday Bazaar at the Garden Home Recreation Center on Saturday, December 1st. There were over 100 local art and craft vendors, live entertainment, holiday music, pancake breakfast and more!

We held a Veteran’s Day event on Saturday, November 10 at the Garden Home Recreation Center, with photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha Post 104, American Legion presented the colors. Sig Unander presented the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat. Click here to read more about the event and to view the event photos.

Visit the spooky and humorous Garden Home Graveyard Halloween display on SW 82nd Ave by Kirstin Lurtz!

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway)

Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history.

Click here to read more about the history of Lamb’s Thriftway.

Posted in News | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Garden Home Growlers

This history of the Garden Home Growlers, located in the Lamb’s Thriftway (now the Garden Home Marketplace), was written by the owner Allen Tyler, 2018. The business was sold to ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Adam and Diana Martinez in 2018.  growler became popular as a large jug used to transport beer. They are commonly sold at  breweries and brewpubs as a means to sell take-out craft beer.  By 2018, Portland had become notable as a city with more than 70 craft breweries, more than any city in the world.   Ed: Elaine Shreve 

Once upon a time, in the small neighborhood of Garden Home, there was a grocery store. And inside that grocery store, there was a small pizza restaurant that sold big pizzas. One day, the pizza restaurant closed and moved their equipment out.

Now, the owners of the grocery store still wanted to have a business in that space, so they put up a bright pink “For Rent” sign. And that is where our story really begins….

Not long after the bright pink sign was posted, a local resident (who loves craft beer) walked by the sign after buying milk at the grocery store. And a wee little thought emerged as a spark in that resident’s head and heart.

That spark was an idea to use the space to sell craft beer. Back then, craft beer was scarce in Garden Home, and residents had to venture far from home in search of beers that would make their taste buds dance.

So the resident started to think more seriously about the spark, and he talked to the grocery store manager about the bright pink sign. And the resident started to research and explore other craft beer bars (and of course to taste other craft beers).

Before long, a lease was drafted and signed by the resident and the landlord. Construction began, in order to prepare the space to serve craft beer.

First, there was plumbing to be done. Then, there was electrical work, as well as painting. And cleaning, always cleaning. A bar was installed. And then a walk-in cooler. And the brand new cooler had twenty holes drilled into the side, and twenty new taps were installed. The floor was polished, and polished again, until it shone brightly. And still more cleaning was done.

Many items had to be purchased as well. Tables, chairs, glasses, racks, towels, cleaning supplies, TVs, magnets, markers, bus tubs, and more than a few sticky notes. Paper towels, hand soap, paint, plastic cups, hoses, and lots of cups of coffee.

Contracts were entered, and subscriptions were initiated. TV, internet, phone, insurance, gas suppliers, bookkeepers, accountants, and line cleaners. A domain name was purchased, a website was created, and social media accounts were registered. Bank accounts were opened, and new checks printed.

Applications for licenses and permits were submitted. And there was much waiting, as the organizations processing those applications do not operate rapidly. But the resident remained patient and focused, confident that approval would be granted.

And then, when all the paperwork was processed, and all was approved (after some very big checks had been written), the resident met with beer sales representatives and ordered the first kegs. IPAs and Stouts! Porters and Orange Beers! Ciders and Lagers! So many tasty choices. The kegs arrived and were placed on tap. It has even been said that a tablet exists that has the names of the original twenty kegs etched into it, to be recorded and remembered for eternity.

So finally, on August 27th, 2014, after all the applications had been approved, purchases had been made, and equipment had been installed, the business called Garden Home Growlers officially opened for the first time. The business could not open its doors for the first time, because, you see, there are no doors. Instead, one might say, “on August 27th, 2014, Garden Home Growlers opened their taps for the first time!”

And the local resident and craft beer fan was happy, because now, other local residents and craft beer fans finally had a place to gather with tasty craft beer and wonderful good cheer amongst each other. And the Garden Home Community became a better place.

Cheers to you!

The end.

Posted in People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Don Sprague obituary

Donald Marvin Sprague Jr., February 6 1948 to October 12 2018

Don was a beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, cousin, neighbor, veteran and friend who touched so many lives in his short 70 years.

With a heavy heart and great sadness, our beloved Don Sprague parted this world on October 12 after a courageous fight with pancreatic cancer. He was diagnosed with terminal stage 4 cancer in July 2018 and though he bravely and willingly faced the difficult and painful journey ahead through chemotherapy, rehab and treatment, his disease quickly spread and landed him in hospice care. He was surrounded by family and loved ones on his last days as he passed peacefully at home. Don always brightened any room with his signature beard, humor and charm. He continued to make jokes and laughs until the very end.

Donald Marvin Sprague Jr. was born to Donald & Rose Sprague in Portland, Oregon on February 6th, 1948. He had 4 siblings Gary, Joanne, Mike and Jerry.He proudly served for the United States Naval Construction Battalions, better known as the Seabees at the young age of 18.

He married his best friend and love of his life, Trish at the age of 22. They spent 48+ wonderful year married, raising 3 children and rescuing several animals. Don touched countless lives with his kindness, charm, humor, smile, laughter and love. Many families will forever remember Don especially during the holiday season as “Santa” who selflessly paid a special visit to countless children in hospitals, community centers, childcare facilities and homes to brighten up their days. His vibrant, loving and kind soul truly embodied the real meaning of Christmas. When Don was first diagnosed with terminal cancer the first thing he said was, “what about all the kids at Christmas?” Even with his own life struggles, he was selflessly thinking about kids he’s visited over the 20+ years of being Santa.

Don lived a fulfilled & blessed life. He always loved working with his hand and had several careers including being a mechanic, an engineer for PGE, a technician for Intel and Radysis, working at the Red Cross to ensure much needed blood donation supplies were ready and above all else, his most loved work was his selfless devotion to spreading Christmas cheer to thousands of kids and families over the years as Santa. He is survived by his wife, Trish; his children: Tod, Jonathan and Shannon; 8 Grandchildren; and many more sisters, brothers, nieces and nephews.

He has filled so many lives with joy and laughter and his spirit will continue to live on in everyone who loves him. To honor Don’s life and continue the work of some of the important causes he championed including delighting children during Christmas time as “Santa” and rescuing animals, the family has set up a memorial fund, in lieu of flowers, cards and gifts: www.gofundme.com/don-sprague-memorial-fund.

In honor of Don’s service to our country as a veteran and as the Santa loved by many, an honors service will be held on Friday, November 9th at 1:00PM at the Willamette National Cemetery.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Marlene Carol (Nance) Tufts, PhD obituary

Marlene Carol (Nance) Tufts, PhD, May 2, 1938 – November 8, 2018

Marlene Tufts, 80, passed away peacefully in the early morning of Nov. 8, 2018, at Autumn Hills Memory Care Center in Portland, with her daughter, Luann by her side.
Marlene was born in Albany, Ore., but her parents soon moved to Upper Darby, Penn. and finally to Sacramento, Calif. She went to Fruitridge Elementary School (K-8) where in 1951 she met her lifelong best friend Maryann Eeds. She graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School in 1956, attended Graceland College in Lamoni, Iowa, and received her BA (1964) and MS (1968) from Sacramento State College. She received a PhD in Psychology from
the University of Hawaii in 1986. She was brilliant and erudite and a true scientist.
Marlene began teaching psychology at Clackamas Community College in September 1969 and retired in 1999. Her courses were among the most popular at the college and many of her students became dear friends. Some were so loyal they banded together to care for her so she could remain independent for as long as possible during her final illness in her Garden Home home where she lived for 50 years.

Marlene was a music and movie aficionado and an avid reader. She loved the outdoors and was a backpacker, hiker, river rafter and a serious birder. She traveled to every continent except Antarctica and preferred exploring third-world cities and countries over luxury tourist resorts. In her own words, she was a “lover of life and experiences, good wine and delicious food and exceptional men!” After retirement she took up yoga and enjoyed working in her yard, making it a home for native wildlife. She lived in her home until April of 2018.

Marlene is survived by her daughters, Jody and Luann (Lulu) Tufts; her granddaughter, Viori Tufts; her sister, Lillian Jevning (husband Les); her nephews, Joseph and Matthew Kennedy (wives Janell and Katia); her forme husband, Andy Tufts; and other members of a special group of lifelong family and friends, fondly named the E-Poo’s, who loved her fiercely and will never forget her, Erik Olsen (sons Gian and Jake), Tom Upchurch (children Diego, Windy and Monte), Les Jevning (children Derek, Marshall and Bridget), Richard Kennedy, Maryann Eeds (sons Jon and Joel Haddock), Marilyn Hughey, Kristin Harvey, Natalie Warrens, Jeanette Winkler and Jane Rickenbaugh. She was preceded in
death by her dearest friend, Joan Hughey in 2006. A festive memorial celebration for Marlene (Marlene Tufts – A Life Well Lived) will be held from Noon-3 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019, at the Gregory Forum at Clackamas Community College. Please join us if you considered Marlene your friend. Marlene was a long-term supporter of Oregon Public
Broadcasting and regularly watched Frontline, Nova, Masterpiece Theatre, Nature, Doctor Who and PBS Newshour. In lieu of flowers, please consider becoming a member or donating to OPB.

Posted in News, Obituaries, People | Tagged , | 1 Comment

November 10, 2018 Veteran’s Day Honors

On Saturday, November 10, we held our Veteran’s Day Honors at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha American Legion Post 104 presented the colors. Sig Unander presented the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS, Women Airforce Service Pilots, who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat during WWII.

We want to thank the following local business for donating coffee and pies to our event and for their long-term support of the Garden Home History Project:

  • Garden Home Shari’s
  • Garden Home Starbucks
  • Garden Home Market Place
Posted in Events, People | Tagged , | 3 Comments

November 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

Saturday, December 1st (all day) – Join us for the 34th annual Holiday Bazaar! Enjoy shopping with over 100 local art and craft vendors, live entertainment, holiday music, pancake breakfast and more! The Garden Home History Project will have a booth in Room 7. Come by for holiday ornaments, 2019 vintage Garden Home calendars, and suet-laden pine cones for feeding winter birds. For more information, visit the Garden Home Recreation Center’s event page.

Seen in Garden Home

New Stories

Read the memoir by Ward Nelson about growing up in Garden Home in the 1950s and 1960s.

Read our new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

Jacki Wisher and her mother Letha Lane talk about the fun at Alpenrose, their Shetland ponies, and growing up in Garden Home. Click here to read the story.

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works with Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report about the Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018.

We have a new story about the development of SW Multnomah Blvd, written by Lowell Swanson, that was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949.

News

We held a Veteran’s Day event on Saturday, November 10 at the Garden Home Recreation Center, with photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha Post 104, American Legion presented the colors. Sig Unander presented the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat.

Visit the spooky and humorous Garden Home Graveyard Halloween display on SW 82nd Ave by Kirstin Lurtz!

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

October 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2018 Veterans Celebration

November 10, 2018 Veterans Celebration

 

Saturday, November 10, 1 to 3:45pm – Photos, interviews, historic displays, pie and coffee. Aloha Post 104, American Legion will “present the colors”. Sig Unander will present the slide show of Fly Gals, the story of the first American women military pilots in history, the WASPS who flew vital training and  flight missions freeing up men for combat. Free, all welcome. Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road.

New Stories

Visit the spooky and humorous Garden Home Graveyard Halloween display on SW 82nd Ave by Kirstin Lurtz!

Read the memoir by Ward Nelson about growing up in Garden Home in the 1950s and 1960s.

Read our new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

Jacki Wisher and her mother Letha Lane talk about the fun at Alpenrose, their Shetland ponies, and growing up in Garden Home. Click here to read the story.

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works with Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report about the Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018.

We have a new story about the development of SW Multnomah Blvd, written by Lowell Swanson, that was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949.

News

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

 

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | Leave a comment

August 25, 2018 Ice Cream Station at the Mini Market (photos)

The Garden Home Recreation Center hosted a Mini-Market on August 25, 2018 with a variety of vendor booths, bouncy house, puppet show, and beer garden. The Garden Home History Project set up historical displays of Garden Home dairies and served ice cream sundaes.

Posted in Events, News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Ward Nelson – Garden Home memoir

Ward Nelson - 2011 100th anniversary of Garden Home School

Ward Nelson – 2011 100th anniversary of Garden Home School

We moved to 7814 SW Occidental Avenue as it was called in those days, in 1947. Today it is 7170 SW 76th. My parents were Helene and Ward Nelson. We moved from Ardenwald, near Milwaukie, where my grandmother lived. Our property butted up against the Garden Home school woods. We could climb over the fence and play in the woods with lots of hiding places. The woods were next to Aaron Frank’s property. Frank was the owner of the Meier and Frank department store in downtown Portland.

My brother Bill was born about the time we moved. We had a large property; our house sat on the front half of it, and there was a huge pasture in back with a chicken coop and pig pen. We had an acre of land, and there was plenty of land to raise animals and to have a garden, which tied in with my father’s upbringing in rural Minnesota. Mother, who grew up in Ardenwald, was a city girl and was not too thrilled about living in the country! During the time we lived there we had, at one time or another, chickens, pigs, sheep, a cow, turkeys, geese.

At first, there was just the house; my father later built the garage which contained a large work space for his U-bolt business. Our property contained a number of apples trees, a peach tree, several pear trees, a plum tree, a filbert tree, cherry trees, and walnut trees. There was an enormous spruce, I think it was, in front of the house, and I used to climb to the very top, from which I could see the school.

My father worked originally for McCall Oil, driving truck, but he eventually went to work for Schwager Wood, a high-voltage manufacturing company in Multnomah. The plant was located at the corner of Multnomah Blvd. and 35th. Mother stayed home to begin with but worked at a variety of places: the Bank of California, Securities Intermountain, Inc.; Herlen Homes, and finally Bucher Realty. My parents were divorced in 1968, and she eventually married Wylis Bucher, the owner of Bucher Realty.

As a child, my brother and I stayed with Mrs. Anna Lindley, who lived up the street and who cared for a number of neighborhood children. She lived in what was then the third house on the west side of the street. She also had a large yard with a chicken coop in the back. She had a shed in the back that was not attached to the house, and one room was the proverbial woodshed where she literally had cords of wood stacked up, and the other end was her laundry room with an old Maytag wringer washer. It was the kind you had to crank.

“Lynn,” as we called her, had a huge garden, and I recall her growing kale, which she dried and fed to her chickens! (Some would say that that is the best use of kale.) She also had a stand of bamboo on the edge of her property, which she called “elephant ears,” and which she guarded zealously. They grew 6-10 feet. Woe to the wayward child who knocked any of those stalks down! She fixed us lunch each day, and it was nearly always the same: sandwiches, and Lipton chicken noodle soup, to which she added elbow macaroni or those little pasta alphabets. She had a wood stove on which she could cook anything, and she never owned an electric stove. Each day she listened to “The Romance of Helen Trent,” and “Nora Drake.” My most vivid memory is of the earthquake in 1949; she herded us into the middle of the living room, and we all stood there until it was over.

Our original neighbor was a woman named Ethel Fraley. Around 1950 or so, the Flowers family moved in: Dave, Elsie, Brad, Dick, Ann, Jean, and eventually Lynn, and Virginia. The four oldest graduated from Beaverton High, and Lynn and Virginia (Ginger) graduated from Parkrose High in the late 60s or early 70s. The Flowers lived there until I graduated from high school in 1962 at which point the Harmons moved in. The Flowers kids and I used to play First Bounce or Fly (a kind of baseball game) in the street because it was a dead end, butting up against Aaron Frank’s property.

76th is the street just west of the school, left side of photo

The Billups, Lynn and Mrs. Thompson lived on the west side of Occidental along with the Goldsmiths and their son Tom, and the Holmes. On the east side of the street from south to north were Mrs. Replogle and her son Dave; old Mr. Dale who lived next door; the Grants who later moved to the Hunt Club; Mrs. Van Patten; the Potters whose house hasn’t changed a bit; the Bettendorfs and their son Bob; and the Slettlands (I think—something like that). There really was very little change in the neighbors over the years. My good friend was Clark Martin, who lived over on 77th, and we used to go back and forth using the empty field that was right across from our house. We decided to make wine when we were in high school as Clark either had gotten a kit from someone or a recipe; at any rate, suffice it to say that it never really turned out! Clark and I both went to Willamette to college, and he was the best man at my wedding.

I started school at the Garden Home Elementary School in 1950. My first grade teacher was Leone Santee; second was Helen McEwen; third, Stella Morrison; fourth, Margaret Brockhaus; fifth, Ruth Kaiser; sixth, Robert Polier; seventh, Frances Lawrence; eighth, Leonard Gustafson. I was the valedictorian of the Class of 1958. Wayne Thurman was the principal and Bobbie Henderson was the secretary for the entire eight years I was there. In the third grade, Mrs. Morrison would have one of her pet students, either me or Cheryl Eastman, go across the street to the corner grocery store to buy her a U-No bar! I can’t imagine that happening today, to be sure.

That store, owned by the Throckmorton’s, burned in 1956. Mrs. Throckmorton apparently fainted when she saw the store go up in flames. It was really a dramatic event in a small community. Right across the street was a gas station owned by Gust Johnson, whose daughter Dorothy went on to become the first runner-up in the Miss America pageant, which everyone watched in those days.

Starting in the second grade, I took piano lessons from Jim Bastien, who lived on Oleson Road, near the intersection, in a house that is still there today. I recall vividly the time Jim played a piano concerto with the Portland Junior Symphony, as it was called in those days. He eventually married, and he and his wife went on to produce a very popular series of piano method books and ancillary materials. In the seventh grade, Phil McGriff, who was the other seventh grade teacher and also the school band director, twisted my arm into learning how to play the tuba, and as a result, I played tuba through graduate school, thus making for a very musical upbringing.

1957 Garden Home School PTA members Mrs. Byron Meisner and Mrs. Ward Nelson at a PTA event in Pendleton, Oregon

1957 Garden Home School PTA members Mrs. Byron Meisner and Mrs. Ward Nelson at a PTA event in Pendleton, Oregon.
See post.

My mother was president of the PTA in my eighth grade year and had been involved for several years. The PTA put on an annual carnival, the Frontier Frolic, as a fund raiser for the school. She worked with some really neat women: Jean McCarthy, Margaret Emmons come to mind, but there were others. She had a scrapbook that she had put together of her years in the PTA, and it is now in the hands of the Garden Home History Project. This scrapbook will be available to read in the library when they get their new space.

As a family, we didn’t have lots of money, and so we didn’t go on extravagant vacations, but we went to the beach frequently and camped. My favorite place was the federal campground at Cape Perpetua, south of Yachats. We also stayed in Wheeler in a motel while my father and his friends went fishing, crabbing, and clamming. Our best friends were Harvey and Grace Reinhardt. Harvey and his brother Fritz owned a construction business, and they built the addition to the school, and they also built Garden Home Enterprises as well as the new Methodist church. Harvey died when I was in the eighth grade, and Grace eventually remarried. Lamb’s Thriftway was the anchor, and there was also an ice cream shop; Dr. William Later, a dentist; a cleaner’s; a variety store; the post office; a drug store; and an office for Garden Home Enterprises itself. Mother kept the books for Garden Home Enterprises. Several people invested money in GHE, including my grandmother, Gertrude Herzog, not related to the Robert Herzog family from Garden Home.

We had a black lab named Skip, and one day, he followed Mother to the office, unbeknownst to her. He slithered into her office, still unseen, and lay down behind the door. Mom did not know he was there, and so she locked up for the night and left the poor dog there. When she went to the office the next day, Skip had tried to claw his way out of the office, leaving a big gouge in the door. We all felt awful about the oversight!

Richfield Gas Station map, circa 1940’s

In 1956, I started an Oregonian morning paper route. The box where we picked up our papers was located at the corner at the intersection of Oleson and Garden Home Road. Don Woldridge was the manager. There were three or four routes in Garden Home. You had to get up around 4:45, head to the corner, rain or shine, pick up your papers, and deliver them on your bike. At the end of the month, you had to collect from your customers. The daily and Sunday paper cost $1.95, the daily only was $1.30, and the Sunday only was $.65. Daily and Sunday customers almost always gave you two dollars, and I always had the nickel in change ready. Some let me keep it, but many did not. This was a 365-day-a year job—no time off for good behavior! The route went down Oleson Road to the Hunt Club, into the Hunt Club and back around the corner on Oleson, then up Canby Street, eventually coming out at Whitney’s Cannery. From there, it was up Garden Home Road to 66th, down that street and all along those back roads, eventually coming back to GH Road and then to the Methodist church on Royal at Garden Home Road, down Royal Avenue (71st), back up and then down Jaeger (74th), eventually winding up in the new area that came out on Oleson Road on Stewart Street. It was a long route! I had 65+ dailies and 80+ Sundays.

There were some really interesting people who lived on that route: the Hunt Club group, the Porshmans, both the school cooks Isolda Steele and Ellen Norris, Aaron Frank, Rev. Wood, Therese Sutter, and many others. Clark would occasionally sub for me when we were gone. My parents would usually take me around on Sunday because the papers were so thick, but I also had to do it myself often, which meant having to go back to the box twice to pick up enough papers to take around.

I recall picking up the papers one morning and reading that the Russians had launched a satellite, Sputnik, and being scared to go on the route that day! Speaking of the Russians, we had a civil defense drill every Monday: the siren would go off at 12:05, and I recall always stopping when I heard it to make sure it was Monday and that it was 12:05. I had seen a super scary movie entitled “Invasion USA,” about the Russians invading and blowing up New York City. Those were the heady days of the cold war.

BHS 1951 building (removed 3rd floor after earthquake)

From Garden Home Grade School, I entered Beaverton High in 1958 and graduated in 1962. I then went to Willamette University in Salem, majoring in music and picked up the organ as my major instrument. All the time I was growing up, I attended the Methodist church, participating in the Methodist Youth Fellowship (MYF), and playing the piano for Sunday School. They purchased an electronic organ around 1958 or so, and I took some lessons from the company that installed it, but it was never my thing until I discovered the pipe organ in college and went bonkers! In college, I played at the West Salem Methodist Church my junior and senior years, and I earned enough money for trips to Monk’s, a local watering hole in Salem! I always thought that if the kindly folks at that church knew what I was spending their hard-earned money on, they might not have been too pleased. I got $40 a month and had to walk from the dorm over to West Salem my junior year; my senior year, I had a ’54 Chev that got me around nicely!

From Willamette, I went to Michigan State to get my Master’s degree in music, returned to Oregon and became the organist at Valley Community Presbyterian Church in Raleigh Hills and the band director for the Vernonia School District. In 1980, I took the position of music director at St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in Beaverton, and in 1985, I switched teaching assignments from music to English, having picked up an English endorsement from Lewis and Clark. I retired from Vernonia in 1998, taught half-time five more years, and then subbed in the Beaverton district for another ten years. I retired from St. Bart’s in June of 2017.

Currently, my wife Pam and I live in the Claremont development at the corner of West Union and Bethany Blvd., and our son Mark and his wife Nia and their two children live in Novato, California.

– Ward Nelson, 2018

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged | 4 Comments

September 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

Upcoming Events

1903 Halloween Murder on Garden Home Road

Monday, October 8, 6:30pm – 40-minute slide presentation on the 1903 Halloween Murder on Garden Home Road. Surprise ending! Garden Home Recreation Center, 7475 SW Oleson Road.

New Stories

Read the memoir by Ward Nelson about growing up in Garden Home in the 1950s and 1960s.

Read our new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

Jacki Wisher and her mother Letha Lane talk about the fun at Alpenrose, their Shetland ponies, and growing up in Garden Home. Click here to read the story.

Periodically, the Garden Home History Project works with Christina Friedle, Chair of Geography at PCC to facilitate student research in her Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate course in the area of mapping and geographic research. This article is a student research report about the Historic Oregon Electric Railway and Station Locations prepared by Brendon Slattery, 2018.

We have a new story about the development of SW Multnomah Blvd, written by Lowell Swanson, that was first printed in the Multnomah Historical Society’s Winter 2005 newsletter. The story was retrieved for us by Tim Lyman, their Chair, and is printed with his permission. It validates the date and process of discontinuing the railroad through Multnomah and pulling the rail tracks east of the Garden Home Station and Multnomah Boulevard developed. The contract for construction of Multnomah Blvd scheduled completion by August, 1949.

News

We sold ice cream sundae’s and displayed binders describing Garden Home’s historical dairies at the Saturday, August 25 Mini-Market at the Garden Home Recreation Center. Thanks to Darrell MacKay for our new banner, designed by Stan Houseman.

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

Gerry Frank promotional photo 2018

What to eat, see, and do in Oregon: We recently said hello to one of our favorite people, Gerry Frank, as he was selling his wonderful  book, Gerry Frank’s OregonGerry spent many summers in Garden Home and has always been a strong supporter. Gerry was our Senator Mark Hatfield’s Chief of Staff and often called “our third Senator.” Read his amazing story and see the wonderful vintage photos of his home and horses. Pick up his book for your travels! New York? Get that one, too.

Garden Home Community Library:  We welcome our new Library Director Molly Carlisle, who previously worked at the Tigard Library.  You might enjoy many newly added vintage library photos in our story about the history of the community library. The library started out as a volunteer library once the Garden Home School closed in 1982, assisted by THPRD.  It soon became part of WCCLS. Thanks to the many generous donors, we were able to enlarge from one classroom to two classrooms, the current size.  Now we are excited about the plans to enlarge to one more classroom.  Watch for our display of community history and news on the hallway walls.

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

 

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | 1 Comment

August 2018 News

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find almost two hundred stories and over fifteen hundred photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events.

News

Passing of Curtis Tigard. At 109, Curtis was one of the oldest living World War II veterans. To read more about Curtis Tigard, visit the Tigard Historical Association. You can also read about Curtis Tigard on the City of Tigard website (PDF document).

We’ve added a new story about Pat Bonney and her son Ken Woodard. Ken was the head coach of Portland State University’s track and field and cross country programs. Ken’s brother Keith has the same position at Lewis and Clark College.

The Garden Home School class of 1958 held a reunion. Organized by Darrel MacKay and Ward Nelson among others. The people pictured are (left to right): Darrell MacKay, Doug Burns, Rita Losli, (Thoreson), Gordy Johnson, Lee Stapleton, Babs Tennent, (Anderson), Mike Sprague, Cheryl Eastman, (Mayhew), Connie Barns, (Anderson), Ward Nelson, Sandy Wood, (Poutala) not in our grade school class, but in our high school class and married Arnie Poutala, Don Stapleton, Arnie Poutala.

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Class of 1958 Garden Home School 2018 Reunion

Lightning strike! On Thursday, June 21 at 7:56am, lightning struck and exploded two redwood trees on SW 84th Avenue just north of SW Garden Home Road. A third tree was also damaged on a neighbor’s property. No injuries or major structural damage were sustained. Thanks to Stan Houseman for the photographs of the aftermath.

We rang the historic 100-year old bell hanging in the bell tower of the Garden Home Marketplace (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) on June 16, 2018. Our ears are still ringing! Thanks to Store Manager Mike Babbitt and all of the store staff for withstanding four hours of bell ringing. Click here to view all the photos of the bell ringing event.

Garden Home Market Place (formerly Lamb’s Thriftway) is changing their signage. Forrest Lamb first built and opened the Garden Home Thriftway in 1957. The store and the mall store buildings were owned by Forrest and Neva Lamb and then by their three sons, Bob, Gary and Colin Lamb. Forrest died in 1986 and Gary Lamb died in 1999. Neva died in 2005 at age 97. Bob Lamb sold the business of the grocery store in June of 2015. Colin Lamb retains ownership of the grocery building and the mall complex.

In 2015, Lamb’s Thriftway store was sold to a local company, Signature Northwest LLC , whose CEO is Mark Miller. This company also purchased three other Lamb grocery businesses and two Bales Thriftway stores, one in Cedar Mill and one in Aloha. Mike Babbitt is the store manager in Garden Home.

The large Lamb’s Thriftway Marketplace sign was removed from the front of the building in June, 2018 for repainting and renaming the store to (probably) be Garden Home Marketplace. The store continues to host the florist, liquor store, the Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and the Garden Home Growlers. The Growler section has grown beyond the first assigned space inside the main door and now flows into the former floral department with six tables.

The one-hundred year old bell from the former Garden Home Community Church continues on loan from the Methodist Conference and hangs in the bell tower at the main entrance. The store continues its important role supporting and recognizing community activities. The Garden Home History Project has an annual Bell Ringing event to publicize Garden Home’s unique history. Click here to read the full history of the Lamb family and Lamb’s Thriftway.

Friday, May 18, we held a reception honoring Ginny Mapes, author of Garden Home-the way it was, Traces of the Past and Chakeipi, the story of early Beaverton.  Slides of vintage Garden Home, refreshments and a reunion with classmates and teachers in Garden Home School. Click here to read more and view the full gallery of event photos.

This Summer: We’re gathering the unique features of Garden Home that we’ll unfold for you in some manner, wonderful surprises! Stay posted for the details.

Upcoming Events

June 24 to August 19. Summer Scavenger Hunt sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center. Visit the office at the rec center to join the hunt!

Saturday, August 25. Summer Mini Market sponsored by the the Garden Home Recreation Center.

Other News

Remembering many of our other stories. These fun excerpts from our stories are just samples of the content you can discover browsing our almost 200 articles. We hope you are writing your story for your family.

Colin Lamb: The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the Columbus Day storm in 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day.

Dan Nebert: Therefore, the church window at all times seemed to remain unlocked, so that we were always able to enjoy our rainy Saturday afternoon ping-pong games.

Plane crash: Lt Strong managed to guide the plane over the town of Metzger to what looked like a wooded area before bailing out and landing in some nearby trees unhurt.

Zora and Sharka Becvar: We sat for a little while and, since we did not understand what the teacher was saying, we just looked at each other, got up and left the room and went home.

Bob Feldman: you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. 

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We had five thirty-minute slide presentations 2017 from 6:30 to 7 pm. Our Board then meets at 7 pm. We’d love to have anyone interested to work with us.

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Tagged | Leave a comment

Patty Bonney and son Ken Woodard

By Elaine Shreve, July 10, 2018

Patty Bonney brought her three children to Garden Home in 1960 when she married Bill Bonney. Patty, Ken, Keith and Carolyn all joined Bill in his home on two acres on SW Oleson Road south of the Garden Home intersection near SW 89th Ave. Bill worked at Tektronix. Bill and Patty soon added Alan in 1964 and Regina in 1966 to the household. Unfortunately, Bill died in 1976.

Bill’s story is also interesting. When Bill’s mother died in 1926, he was about six years old and his father, not knowing what to do, placed him at the St. Mary’s Home for Boys on Tualatin Valley Highway in Beaverton. Founded in 1889 as an orphanage for abandoned and wayward children, today St. Mary’s offers residential treatment and services for at-risk boys. Bill stayed there for a year until his father came for him. Patty says Bill was scarred from his year there and was anti-religious the rest of his life.

As was not unusual in that era, Bill’s family did not support his desire to go to high school. For his senior year he moved into a boarding house in Portland and paid his way working in the chemistry lab at Lincoln High where he attended for three years.

Patty became a faithful volunteer at Garden Home School. In the early days of the 1970s, she worked in Mary Jane Seiffert’s classroom one year and the school library. In the library she volunteered under Ginny Mapes’ direction and helped on the first Garden Home history book, Garden Home – the way it was. In about 1975 she started volunteering in Mrs. Carol Lintner’s classroom. Mrs. Lintner’s name now is Carol Bambace and they live in Lake Oswego. After many years of retirement, Patty and Carol still get together annually for birthdays.

Patty was often seen walking along Oleson Road to her home reading a book enroute. We all knew her, with her sun or rain hat, her backpack, and a good mystery book. This was before the current sidewalks. She also enjoys histories such as Jane Kirkpatrick’s historical fiction about NW women or reviewing her books of true stories about Australia.

Garden Home has an active branch of the Oregon State University’s Extension program, called the Garden Home Families and Community Education Study Group, FCE, (but commonly called Extension). This Extension group has had a long history here in Garden Home and served as a community service organization that follows the OSU Extension education programs. Community service is encouraged for all participants. Patty has enjoyed knitting tiny hats for the gift bags that are distributed to all newborns at the Tuality Community Hospital in Hillsboro during the month of May each year. These gifts bags each contain new books, blankets, and other supplies for the babies. They took 25 decorated bags to the hospital this last May.

Click here to read more about the Garden Home Extension Study Group.

When the Garden Home School closed in June of 1982, the Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District began to rent a few of the rooms. Many of the school’s library books had remained in the building. Patty and a small group of mothers including Catherine Kent and her daughter Marie Pacella, Helen Sanford and Judy Freck began the development of a community lending library run by volunteers. Judy Freck was instrumental in the organization of library and along with her husband Bill Freck continued to manage the library until it was accepted into the Washington County Cooperative Library Services.

Click here to read more about the the Garden Home Community Library.

Patty, now in her 80s, keeps a very busy schedule that now includes church activities and square dancing. After knitting ‘thousands’ of premie caps for hospital newborns, she now knits scarves from yarn on hand to give to the Northwest Pilot Project, NWPP, a service organization for the elderly poor in downtown Portland. “It’s a good cause and the projects are mindless. I can do all kinds of things with them while paying little attention, suitable for meetings.”

Patty’s dentist, Dr. Steven Little, wrote a laudatory article for the Southwest Portland Post saying he’s seen her knitting while getting dental work done. “you’ll see her laid back in the dental chair, hygienist at work and Patty’s knitting needles up in the air creating one of her precious gifts.” Patty first met Steven as a dental technician at the dental school before he became a fully qualified dentist. Dr. Little says she was his first patient.

Ken and Keith Woodard graduated from Beaverton High in 1967 and 1968, Carolyn Woodard in 1969, Alan Bonney in 1982, and Regina who took her GED (she would have graduated in 1984).

[Editor: Carolyn was our first babysitter for our twins Tom and Andy back in 1967. At first we thought we’d need two sitters but Carolyn proved totally capable and continued with us for several years. – Elaine Shreve]

Ken Woodard – When Bill and Patty married, Ken began at Garden Home School in the 6th grade. Len Gustafson was the principal. Ken went on through eighth grade at Garden Home and then into Beaverton High for the historic 1964-65 year of the high school running double shifts to accommodate the 4 grades of high school and to serve the large attendance area. The next year Aloha High operated 2 grades out of the Merle Davies Elementary building while Aloha High was being built. Whitford Intermediate School opened in 1963 which soon took on the 9th grade class of students leaving 3 grades at Beaverton High.

In 1944, voters in Beaverton School District 48 and over a dozen elementary districts approved the formation of a union high school district. Then in 1944 with an increase in the number of students, a high school and 12 elementary schools consolidated to form Beaverton District 48. New school buildings have continued to the present year, 2017-18, when the new Mountainside High School opened off of Scholls Ferry Road. *See School Days by Gerald Varner (book).

Ken’s interest in sports began at Garden Home School where the boys played competitive flag football and basketball against other local grades schools. He remembers the blue and white Wildcat t-shirts. Ken went on to excel in cross country distance running and then became head Cross Country/Track and Field coach at Portland State University in the 1980s and 1990s. His brother Keith was his assistant. Ken is married and built his own home on Oleson at 89th. Ken enjoys buying old tractors and restoring them to sell.

Ken’s brother Keith Woodard is now head Cross Country/Track and Field Coach and program Director today at Lewis & Clark College., his 11th year coaching at Lewis & Clark. Both of these men have had outstanding track careers.

* Varner, Gerald H. School Days, A History of Public Schools in and Around Beaverton, Oregon, 1856-2000. Published by Gerald Varner in association with Beaverton School District. 2000

Posted in Memoirs, People | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments