August 2020 News

In this edition: Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan, Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout?, Century Homes, John & Dawn, True Love, Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, and researching railroad history.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Upcoming Events

Due to the current public health recommendations in response to the COVID-19 virus, we will not have slide programs until the Garden Home Recreation Center re-opens. We have interesting programs planned for the future. Take good care of yourselves.

New Stories

Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan

All about the DeHaan’s and other families who lived on Fanno Creek and SW 92nd Ave and worked the grounds of the Portland Golf Club down through the years, with wonderful vintage photos. See Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan.

Moving a Tree - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis and John DeHaan, moving a tree at the golf course.

Alvas Car - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis’ homemade car, pictured on his father’s farm.

Fogelbo listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Fogelbo, on Oleson Road, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Ross Fogelquist has been very generous in sharing his beautiful home with us. See Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist.

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Murals on Scotty’s Restaurant

Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout? This photo shows the back wall in 2011, we’d love to have photos of the other two murals also. We also have a 1912 B.P.O.E. postcard, courtesy of Shirley Gertsch-Bartels. The card was used to direct the order of delivered milk from the Gertsch’s Shattuck Dairy in 1912. Remember when the Elks Lodge used the upstairs over Scotty’s restaurant? We’d love to learn more about that!

Scotty's back mural

Scotty’s back mural

1912 postcard BPOE invite - front

1912 postcard BPOE invite

Century Homes research continues

We appreciate the many Century Homes that lend substance, beauty, and history to Garden Home. Stan Houseman is developing photos and lists of these homes for future documentation. In time, these home owners will be notified by mail regarding their interest to participate. We believe our oldest home was built in 1890 and we have just over 100 homes built before 1930. Please contact Stan if you have an older home or know of one in Garden Home, Housemanquality@yahoo.com.

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

John & Dawn, True Love cement mystery

When Melissa and Josh Stefanic-Grimsbo tore off the old wooden steps of their 1930s log cabin home at 8550 SW Garden Home Road, they found a cement pad with the touching John & Dawn, True Love scratched into the cement. Does anyone know who might have lived there after the 1930s?

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

Garden Home History board members at work

Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, researching railroad history, and more stories to come! Here are some Garden Home Board members at work for our community.

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway - 2020

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway – 2020

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb's Thriftway closing 2019

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb’s Thriftway closing 2019

Marie Pacella, Treasurer - 2020

Marie Pacella, Treasurer – 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask - 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask – 2020

History of the Portland Golf Club

Established in 1914, the Portland Golf Club is a prestigious private golf club in the Garden Home/Raleigh Hills area. We’ve begun collecting photos and stories about the Portland Golf Club, we hope that you’ll share your stories with us.

Portland Golf Club - original club house

The Portland Golf Club’s original clubhouse stood about where the 7th hole tee is now.

New vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery

Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub and Brewery provided us with a large gallery of vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery. To view the full gallery, see our story on Mark and Leona Whitney and the Whitney Cannery, 1950-1976. Thank you, Shelly!

The Garden Home junction of the Oregon Electric Railway

Read our story on the history of the Garden Home station of the Oregon Electric Railway to view our gallery of vintage photos of the station, including 1936 aerial photos that finally put to rest the exact location of the station. On the photo below, you can clearly see the station building on a raised platform (note the shadows).

1936 Army Corps of Engineers Aerial Photo - Garden Home Railroad Station detail

1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo – Garden Home Railroad Station detail

Garden Home train station - rear

Garden Home train station – rear

Garden Home train station

Garden Home train station

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We often begin with slide show presentations. All are welcome to attend our meetings. We’re an active and fun group, we have lots of opportunities to get involved!
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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August 2020 Update – Garden Home History Email

Hello Garden Home History Friends,

Thank you to all of you who have responded so nicely to our monthly Updates about Garden Home history. We depend on all of you for your stories and photos! We hope you’ll enjoy the following new stories.

Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan – All about the DeHaan’s and other families who lived on Fanno Creek and SW 92nd Ave and worked the grounds of the Portland Golf Club down through the years, with wonderful vintage photos. See Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan.

Moving a Tree - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis and John DeHaan, moving a tree at the golf course.

Alvas Car - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis’ homemade car, pictured on his father’s farm.

Fogelbo, on Oleson Road, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Ross Fogelquist has been very generous in sharing his beautiful home with us. See Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist.

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout? This photo shows the back wall in 2011, we’d love to have photos of the other two murals also. We also have a 1912 B.P.O.E. postcard, courtesy of Shirley Gertsch-Bartels. The card was used to direct the order of delivered milk from the Gertsch’s Shattuck Dairy in 1912. Remember when the Elks Lodge used the upstairs over Scotty’s restaurant? We’d love to learn more about that!

Scotty's back mural

Scotty’s back mural

1912 postcard BPOE invite - front

1912 postcard BPOE invite

Century Homes: We appreciate the many older homes that lend substance, beauty, and history to Garden Home. Stan Houseman is developing photos and lists of these homes for future documentation. In time, these home owners will be notified by mail regarding their interest to participate. We believe our oldest home was built in 1890 and we have just over 100 homes built before 1930. Please contact Stan if you have an older home or know of one in Garden Home, Housemanquality@yahoo.com.

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

John & Dawn, True Love: When Melissa and Josh Stefanic-Grimsbo tore off the old wooden steps of their 1930s log cabin home at 8550 SW Garden Home Road, they found a cement pad with the touching John & Dawn, True Love scratched into the cement. Does anyone know who might have lived there after the 1930s?

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, researching railroad history, and more stories to come! Here are some Garden Home Board members at work for our community.

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway - 2020

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway – 2020

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb's Thriftway closing 2019

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb’s Thriftway closing 2019

Marie Pacella, Treasurer - 2020

Marie Pacella, Treasurer – 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask - 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask – 2020

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Stay safe and well,

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

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Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan

Portland Golf Club members developed and maintained the first nine holes of their golf course. But, local men, from the Garden Home area, developed the other nine holes – half of the golf course. In 1920, the golf club hired Donald Junor as the head greens-keeper. He hired a crew that included some members of my husband’s family, the DeHaans.

John R DeHaan lived on the family farm – five acres that his grandfather, Adam DeHaan, and father, John C DeHaan, had bought in 1890. The farm straddled Fanno Creek on the west side of what is now called 92nd Avenue. Alva Davis was often there, visiting with John’s sister, Dora.

John and Alva joined Donald’s crew at the Portland Golf Club. Ed and Walt Sandberg lived on Garden Home Road and Bill Rice lived nearby on what is now Marissa Drive. Over the years, they worked with John and Alva and we believe they were part of that original greens-keeper crew, too.

Alva drove his homemade car down from the Davis family farm on Mountain Home near Newberg. Then Alva and John, carrying their lunch pails, could walk the Oregon Electric Railway tracks to the golf course tool shed, near where the old club house had been.

One of the greens-keepers’ first jobs was to tackle a beaver dam that flooded a large portion of the grounds. Pulling logs and branches out of the dam had not deterred the beavers. The crew got rid of them, cleared brush, pulled out stumps with the tractor, graded the grounds, and created fairways, tees, and greens.

In 1922, John and Alva married each other’s sisters, acquired adjoining lots on the DeHaan property, and planned the homes they would build. With Alva working at the golf course, his wife, Dora DeHaan Davis, could stay near her family and Alva could work outside, as he had on his father’s farm.

The crew worked at improving the existing nine holes, too. They planted trees between the fairways, used horses to dredge out a lake on Hole 7, and reshaped its bunkers. On Hole 8, they bulldozed a hill so that players could see the flag from the tee.

Even with all their work, there was too much water around the back nine holes. Knowing these men and their personalities, the following conversation could have happened.

“Most of the tee for Hole 18 is a swamp,” Donald worried, “we need to do something about it.”

“We could fill ‘er up, raise the ground a bit,” reckoned Alva as he tapped his pipe on his heel.

John tugged on the bill of his cap. “We’d still have to deal with the water. It’s got to go somewhere.”

“Let’s bring the creek on up to it,” was Alva’s solution.

“Move the creek?” Donald wondered if they really wanted that much work.

“Yup.”

In 1925, Alva and John, along with the other workers, dug a new creek bed with a tractor and shovels. Day after day they pushed wheelbarrows full of rocks to the trench to line its banks. They stooped, crouched, and knelt in the trench to slap concrete between the rocks. And, they put that creek where it could drain the swamp.

Just like the creek, the school district line was also moved. John’s house was re-zoned into the McKay school district and that’s where his children attended school.

John and Alva continued working through the depression, earning $2.85 a day. During the winter, when there wasn’t enough greens-keeper work for both of them, they agreed to take turns working one week at a time. Since they had a cow, pig, and chickens, John and his wife, Effie Davis DeHaan, were able to sustain their family of eight through this time. Effie even fed the down-and-outers who showed up at her back door.

In November 1941, when John’s son, Virgil, was almost 17, he received a special permit to work with machinery at the golf course. He earned $.50 per hour when the minimum wage was only $.30.

After Thanksgiving, Virgil, his pa, and uncle, traveled to the Davis family farm, gathered cedar branches, and decorated the club house for the holidays. Occasionally, they needed to repair something inside the clubhouse. One day, Virgil was working inside, near the ‘Members Only’ slot machine. He had a quarter in his pocket. He kept feeling it there, burning a hole, one might say. He looked around. Pa and Uncle were busy, not watching him. He pulled that quarter out and slipped it into the slot. Pulled the handle. Rumble, clink, clank, clinkety-clank, 100 quarters dropped out of that machine.

Startled, John turned to see that Virgil was causing the commotion, “What’re you doing? You’re not supposed to be foolin’ with that.”

“I didn’t think nothing would happen,” said Virgil while he frantically grabbed at the quarters.

With a chuckle, Alva swooped his large hand under the spout and helped catch the rest of the coins. Virgil scooted after the quarters that had rolled across the floor and quickly stuffed them into his pocket. He was relieved that no club members complained.

Virgil learned to prepare the greens for the players. Donald was still head greens-keeper, but his son, Harvey, gave the instructions. “Take that hose there out to a green and drag it across to knock the dew off. Do all of them that way.”

“Can I mow when I’m done?” The fairway tractor with three reel lawn mowers out each side and one across the back was very interesting to this teenager.

“No, I want you to take the dump truck down to River Sand & Gravel.”

Virgil liked that even better. He put that Model AA in gear and took off. He hauled back a load of river silt and anticipated releasing the handle to dump the load in the work yard.

“Whoa, now, back that truck out on the fairway. Get as close to the green as you can. But don’t drive on it. Take this shovel with you,” Harvey ordered.

Virgil maneuvered that truck out to the green, shoveled silt from the bed, and shook it lightly all over the turf, filling the divot holes.

When Virgil had enough money, he bought a car. One day, a friend asked him to drive him to Portland Gas & Coke so he could apply for a job. Virgil drove him there and when he heard what jobs were available, he left the golf course and went to work at the gas company.

In 1942, John and Alva decided to help the war effort by taking more meaningful jobs. John went to work at Triangle Mills, a grain distributor, in Portland on the Willamette River. Alva became a welder in the shipyards.

By May of 1943, when Virgil was 18, he was drafted for World War II. He was sent to storm the beaches of the South Pacific. He used a caterpillar to clear out air strips so planes could bring in troops and supplies. He sometimes dodged enemy fire by hiding under, or behind, the caterpillar blade.

After the war, Virgil went back to work at Portland Gas and Coke as a pipe welder and then a foreman. Virgil retired years ago and now at 95, lives in a Beaverton senior facility. Likewise, John continued as a millwright at Triangle Mills.

Alva returned to the golf course and told John about the coming 1946 PGA Open. John rode his son’s horse, Smokey, along the old railroad tracks to Hole 15. The tracks ran much closer to the golf course than Fanno Creek Trail does now. John sat there on his horse, watching the golfers for hours. He was pleased to see Ben Hogan, the winner of that tournament.

Alva was still working at Portland Golf Club in 1950, when John’s 15 year old son, Dave (my husband) went to work at the golf course under a worker’s permit. Dave earned $1.25 per hour when the minimum wage was 75 cents.

While his uncle Alva mowed the fairways, Dave mowed greens, roughs, and the old creek banks. While mowing the creek bank that crosses Hole 12, he saw something, he thought a fly, go past his face. Soon, a worried golfer found him and was relieved that his ball had not hit him.

Dave maneuvered an older, smaller version of the above pictured fairway mower through the trees in the roughs, avoiding stray golf balls. If he hit one, he ducked, because the blades would pick it up and send it bouncing off of nearby trees. If it was close to quitting time, he’d hurry, too fast, back to the tool shed. That mower with its spiked metal wheels made a thunderous noise as he sped across the wooden bridge. And he would be reprimanded for it.

When he and a friend were sent to put weed killer on fairway 18, they mixed 1½ times the recommended dose, figuring that would do a better job. That mistake caused large brown patches in the fairway.

By the time Dave turned 16, he had earned enough to buy a ’38 Chevy.

The next summer, he worked on the night crew, watering the fairways. Arriving at work, he’d turn on the water pumps to build up pressure. One pump pulled water from the lake and the other from a well. Then he walked the roughs to find each sprinkler, drag it to a sunken faucet, screw its hose onto that faucet, and drag the sprinkler onto the fairway.  If he was lucky, when he turned the faucet on full blast, the hose wouldn’t blow out and he wouldn’t need to repair it.

Each night, he made four trips around his assigned holes, with 45 to 50 sprinklers to position on each trip. When he made his second trip, it would be dark. He used a kerosene lantern, set on the ground, to show him which direction the sprinkler was currently shooting. Moving into the back side of a sprinkler, he’d grab the vane so that it shot away from him, and dragged it to the next location. The first setting had been near the edge of the fairway. This time he’d set it straight out from the faucet. The next time around, he’d move it back against the edge on the far side of the faucet – the settings creating a fan shape.

And, on his last trip, he’d turn off all of the sprinklers and hide them in the rough, out of sight of the golfers.

He sometimes saw men down by the lake with flashlights, looking for golf balls. He knew they weren’t allowed there. But, alone in the dark, he didn’t confront them. One time he even gave permission. As he neared the lake between fairways 7 and 11, he saw a shape growing larger and larger. He stopped in his tracks. A man popped out from behind a bush and asked, “Would you mind if I got some golf balls out of the lake?”

Shaken, Dave replied, “I don’t give a damn, you can take the whole lake.”

Other nights he’d see people over by Hole 18 sweeping the ground with dim flashlights, collecting night crawlers for their next fishing expedition.

After Dave returned from serving with the Army in Korea, he and I married, and in 1962 we bought a house on Mayo Street, off Oleson Road. Our children attended Garden Home School, just like their grandfather, John DeHaan. And, our son, like his father and grandfather, wanted to work at the golf club. Harvey Junor was still there as head greens-keeper. So, when Randy applied to work at the golf course, the family name got him the interview. But, to get the job, he had to prove that he wanted to work there by asking for it a second time.

As before, the pay was still significantly above the minimum wage. He passed the word to friends from Garden Home. Steve Vale was one of them that worked with him. Steve and Randy were interested in flying. They saved their earnings for flying lessons.

Since we had moved closer to the golf club, near Jamieson Road, Randy rode his bicycle to arrive at work by 5:30 am. On a typical day, before the golfers arrived, the crew steered self-propelled reel mowers across the greens. During the rest of the day, they might spray weeds, paint sheds, trim bushes, take the weed-eater to tall grass around the lake, top-dress greens, cut sod to replace divots on tees, aerate fairways, or shovel sand into the traps and rake them smooth. They had only three Cushman carts to deliver the workers from job to job. So, they piled on where they could.

And, they considered the area from the eleventh tee to the tool shed as a race track of sorts, often coming down the hill and around the corner on two wheels.

Randy spent several weeks repairing the creek banks, the ones his Grandpa John and Uncle Alva had constructed so many years ago. Wearing hip waders, he walked through the creek to knock out loose concrete, mix new, and trowel it in between the rocks. Another friend, Dave Stephens, worked with him on this project and liked to catch the crawdads from the creek and put them on someone’s neck or in their face.

Dave Stephens recalls that all of them used to pick up apples along the fifth fairway, stash them in their carts, and throw them at each other whenever they were close enough. Eventually, this jokester got serious. He turned greens-keeping into a career, and is now the superintendent at a golf club in southern Oregon.

Randy didn’t work nights watering the fairways like his dad had, because by then the club had an automated sprinkler system. If something needed hand watering, he’d use a quick coupler to hook up hoses. And sometimes, he drove the Old Ford tractor pulling a water tank to water trees. He saw Nancy Lopez play in the 1979 LPGA tournament.

Randy and Steve, remain close friends. Randy is a retired Air Traffic Controller and is currently advising the company that is re-writing ATC training manuals and procedures. Steve is still with the FAA and was recently promoted from his position as head Air Traffic Controller of the tower at the Seattle-Tacoma Airport to general manager of the entire region.

Dave had a career as a truck mechanic and shop foreman at a shop for Kenworth trucks. He advised me on much of this story. We now live in Beaverton.

Most of these men took advantage of the one-night-a-week, free golfing for greens-keepers. But they were not invited inside the clubhouse.  Years later, our daughter, Anita, was on the staff of a private school and was an invited guest at that school’s four annual fund-raising events at the Portland Golf Club.

[Editor: read more about the history of the Portland Golf Club.]

Posted in Early History, Memoirs, Places | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Arley Grant Boyce obituary

Arley Grant Boyce, July 29, 1923 to July 27, 2020

Arley Grant and Mary Boyce

Arley Grant and Mary Boyce

Arley Grant Boyce passed from a non Covid-19 related cause, “the old ticker very peacefully just gave out.” Very happy, loved and coherent – right to the conclusion.

Born in Cross Lake, Minn., to Windsor Lansing Boyce (Babe) and Melitta Seekel. Arley married Mary Maxine Gildow from Pine River, Minn., who preceded him in death.

Arley first came west at age 15 by himself working in the CCC’s, building trails out of the Ranger Station at Oak Ridge, Oregon. He was a graduate of Willamette University in business, Pacific University teaching degree, and a Master of Education Administration U of O.

Arley loved education. He was at Beaverton High School teaching business and retail selling, Athletics Director and Vice Principal for 28 years. When he retired the Beaverton Police Dept gave him a badge for being so helpful with kids. He was especially proud of convincing BHS to have business courses, connecting kids with local businesses. He loved to come home and tell fun stories about work or make plans with Mary for another Boyce “Big Adventure” traveling and camping about Oregon or going back to Minnesota with six kids in a Mercury station and a flatbed trailer full of camping gear in tow – singing, “We ain’t got a barrel of money, maybe we’re ragged and funny – but we’ll travel the road sharing our load, side-by-side!” The six kids at one point were all teenagers at the same time.

Arley loved hunting and fishing especially out of Halfway, Ore., in Hell’s Canyon where the girls spent time raising their families when young and Sandy (Kennedy, Brumnette) still lives. Arley and Fritz started “Wildwood Products of Oregon” – making bird houses which became very popular. Arley helped Sandy by supporting her business of “Wildflowers of Oregon” – which gained N.W. fame receiving the Governor’s award for best small business in Oregon, appearing in displays on 5th Avenue in New York City and being distributed as far as Japan. Robert also has his own business, Control Systems West (Instrumentation).
Arley, the great disciplinarian, believed in hard work at any age. When the children were small, he would post the chores schedule for the week. The reward was a silver dollar which he got at Harold Freece’s Shell Station on Canyon Road where he worked on Saturdays to make ends meet. All seemed so organized, solving arguments among the six kids – until Fritz resorted to bribing his younger sisters to do his chores with candy and treats – then all chaos reigned again! The offspring and all who knew Arley will recall with fondness his jovial attitude, interest in others and his remembrance of the past fun stories of friends, relatives, coworkers and cohorts that he and Mary shared the road with along the way.

Arley has six children, Sandy, Robert, Allen, Fritz, Marilyn (deceased), Beverly and their spouses; 14 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.
Arley served in the South Pacific on the Atu – an aircraft carrier that he helped build as a welder in Vancouver, Wash. Arley will be laid to rest with Mary, the love of his life, with a graveside Covid-19 service [only 10 allowed] in Willamette National Cemetery with Navy Honors.

[Editor: Many former Beaverton High School students from the 1970s era will recall Arley Boyce, vice-principal under principal Bill Logan. Arley lived off of east Garden Home Road into the Multnomah area. We enjoy the photo below of Arley with Don Dunbar, former principal of Garden Home school, taken at our October 20, 2012 Centennial Celebration of Garden Home School opening event. ]

Don Dunbar and Arley Boyce, 2012

Don Dunbar and Arley Boyce, 2012

 

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Albert Charles Azar obituary

Albert Charles Azar, April 8, 1925 to July 19, 2020

Al Azar (veteran)

Al Azar (at the Garden Home History Armed Forces Day event May 17, 2014)

Our hearts are saddened at the passing of our father, Al Azar. He passed away at age 95, surrounded by his family.

He was an honest man, a good husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, uncle, and friend. He was born to Charles and Affifi Azar and was the second of four children.

Al served in World War II, and enjoyed a 33-year career in the Army Corps of Engineers. There he met our mother, Lou Anne Hickman, and they were married April 21, 1951.

Dad was an avid bowler, golfer, and fisherman. In his golf career, which spanned 71 years, he won 41 tournaments. He will be greatly missed!

He was preceded in death by his half-sister, Victoria Obeid; and his sisters, Alice Gilmore and Rachael Siri. He is survived by his wife of 69 years, Lou Anne; his son, Richard Azar (Lona); his daughter, Kay Freeman (Doug); his grandson, Cody Freeman (Liesl); his granddaughter, Baylie Freeman-Nelson (Zak); two great-granddaughters, Lyra and Etta Rose Freeman; and sister, Jean Miller.

He will be laid to rest in Willamette National Cemetery in private services due to COVID-19. Those of you who wish to contribute in his name may do so for the “Youth Golf Program” at Heron Lakes Golf Club, 3500 N. Victory Blvd., Portland, OR 97217.

[Editor: read more about Al’s World War II European combat tour in our story about Veterans of Garden Home.]

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged , | 1 Comment

July 2020 Update – Garden Home History Email

Hello Garden Home History Friends,

As we are looking back at some of our favorite stories and photos during this 10th anniversary year, this July Update features summer fun in Garden Home. Horses and baseball were popular choices. We’d love to read about how your family or neighborhood is having fun during this historic time of the COVID-19 virus.

Although we’ve had to suspend our monthly meetings, our History Board continues to work to research, preserve and share our history: Elaine Shreve, Esta Mapes, Marie and John Pacella, Sharon Vedder, Stan and Susan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson and Kevin Mistler.

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. Send us a note about your summer: GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com.

Stay safe and well,

Elaine Shreve

Garden Home History Project 10th Anniversary

Thank you for your interest, participation, and support over the past ten years. We are looking back at some of our favorite stories and photos during this anniversary year. Please send your stories, photos and memories of Garden Home to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com!

Check out these photos and stories about Garden Home summer fun!

The Hunt Club, “Memories of Horsing Around Years”

In her story about the Hunt Club, Patti Ransom Waitman-Ingebritson recalls:

We rode English style around and around in a large indoor riding arena. Bill would shout out instructions as we circled the ring putting our horses through their paces. On one occasion, I decided to switch my little stick/crop from my right to left hand and immediately got stick and reins tangled. [My horse] Airway took off and we raced around the arena, occasionally leaping over little fences not for our level of riding skill. As I rounded the gallery area, my father shouted instructions which I could not understand. Airway and I were making good time as we raced around the arena and by now everyone was shouting instructions. Read more…

Hunt Club track on SW Oleson Rd, viewed from the NE (Garden Home School in upper left of photo)

Baseball in Garden Home

In her story about baseball in Garden Home, Louise Cook Jones writes:

The Garden Home field was always busy. Second and third generation Garden Home folks found themselves on the field once more, with their kids and grandkids – coached by people who used to play ball with them when they were young.

One local baseball star was Jim Partlow. He and his wife Yvonne lived in Garden Home on Firlock Lane [today’s SW 78th Ave]. His children, Dede and Jim, went to Garden Home School. Jim [Sr.] had played for the Grant Generals in high school, went on to Linfield College and was on the all-American basketball team. He was drafted by the Boston Redsox as pitcher, but declined the baseball draft for the army draft. Read more…

Garden Home baseball team in the Sunset Basebase League. Uncle Duke Scherner (right front), Uncle Carl Rehberg (left rear) and Albert Erickson (center).

Garden Home baseball team in the Sunset Basebase League. Uncle Duke Scherner (right front), Uncle Carl Rehberg (left rear) and Albert Erickson (center).
Courtesy Don Smith. See Don Smith story.

Letha (Kidd) Lane and daughter Jacki (Lane) Wisher

In her story about about growing up in Garden Home, Jacki Wisher recalls her summer fun at Alpenrose with her two Shetland ponies and pony-drawn cart:

People came from far and wide to fill the Alpenrose grandstands and enjoy the 4th of July Pageant for several evenings which included many costumes, wagons and ponies. They also enjoyed the Alpenrose Western frontier town buildings and other animals, all for FREE. One chapter of the Pageant portrayed each signer of the Declaration of Independence; the huge draw at the end of the Pageant was the awesome Fireworks for the 4th of July!

Jacki and the fifty or more kids participating in the extravaganza all stayed in large tents on the Alpenrose property. Their ponies stayed in the pony barns. They ate their meals in the Alpenrose owners’personal home. Carl and Virginia Cadanou’s home is still on the property. Read more…

Glory, the pony, with Jacki Wisher's sister Kathy Lane as the driver with two neighborhood girls, Nikki and Mari. Probably 1964 or 1965.

Glory, the pony, with Jacki Wisher’s sister Kathy Lane as the driver with two neighborhood girls, Nikki and Mari. Probably 1964 or 1965.

History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Kids from Garden Home frequented the Alpenrose Dairy to participate in baseball, bicycle riding in the velodrome, go-kart racing, Dairyville shops, petting zoo, and annual July 4th extravaganza and fireworks display. Read more…

Quarter midget go-kart racing at Alpenrose

Quarter midget go-kart racing at Alpenrose (source: The Oregonian – 100 years of history at Portland’s Alpenrose Dairy)

New Stories

History of the Portland Golf Club

Established in 1914, the Portland Golf Club is a prestigious private golf club in the Garden Home/Raleigh Hills area. We’ve begun collecting photos and stories about the Portland Golf Club, we hope that you’ll share your stories with us.

Portland Golf Club - original club house

The Portland Golf Club’s original clubhouse stood about where the 7th hole tee is now.

New vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery

Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub and Brewery provided us with a large gallery of vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery. To view the full gallery, see our story on Mark and Leona Whitney and the Whitney Cannery, 1950-1976. Thank you, Shelly!

Recent News

Sale of the Alpenrose Dairy

Smith Brothers Farms, a Seattle-area competitor, finalized a deal to purchase Alpenrose on Oct. 14, 2019. The deal did not include 52 acres of community space, where Alpenrose has maintained three Little League baseball fields, a velodrome track, 4-H Discovery Farm and “Dairyville” replica frontier town. Alpenrose will continue producing milk, cottage cheese, and sour cream at the dairy’s facilities on SW Shattuck Road.

Alpenrose Dairy from above

Alpenrose Dairy from above

We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.
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July 2020 News

In this edition: History of the Portland Golf Club, celebrating summer fun in early Garden Home, sale of the Alpenrose Dairy, and more.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Upcoming Events

Due to the current public health recommendations in response to the COVID-19 virus, we will not have slide programs until the Garden Home Recreation Center re-opens. We have interesting programs planned for the future. Take good care of yourselves.

Garden Home History Project 10th Anniversary

Thank you for your interest, participation, and support over the past ten years. We are looking back at some of our favorite stories and photos during this anniversary year. Please send your stories, photos and memories of Garden Home to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com!

Check out these photos and stories about Garden Home summer fun!

The Hunt Club, “Memories of Horsing Around Years”

In her story about the Hunt Club, Patti Ransom Waitman-Ingebritson recalls:

We rode English style around and around in a large indoor riding arena. Bill would shout out instructions as we circled the ring putting our horses through their paces. On one occasion, I decided to switch my little stick/crop from my right to left hand and immediately got stick and reins tangled. [My horse] Airway took off and we raced around the arena, occasionally leaping over little fences not for our level of riding skill. As I rounded the gallery area, my father shouted instructions which I could not understand. Airway and I were making good time as we raced around the arena and by now everyone was shouting instructions. Read more…

Hunt Club track on SW Oleson Rd, viewed from the NE (Garden Home School in upper left of photo)

Baseball in Garden Home

In her story about baseball in Garden Home, Louise Cook Jones writes:

The Garden Home field was always busy. Second and third generation Garden Home folks found themselves on the field once more, with their kids and grandkids – coached by people who used to play ball with them when they were young.

One local baseball star was Jim Partlow. He and his wife Yvonne lived in Garden Home on Firlock Lane [today’s SW 78th Ave]. His children, Dede and Jim, went to Garden Home School. Jim [Sr.] had played for the Grant Generals in high school, went on to Linfield College and was on the all-American basketball team. He was drafted by the Boston Redsox as pitcher, but declined the baseball draft for the army draft. Read more…

Garden Home baseball team in the Sunset Basebase League. Uncle Duke Scherner (right front), Uncle Carl Rehberg (left rear) and Albert Erickson (center).

Garden Home baseball team in the Sunset Basebase League. Uncle Duke Scherner (right front), Uncle Carl Rehberg (left rear) and Albert Erickson (center).
Courtesy Don Smith. See Don Smith story.

Letha (Kidd) Lane and daughter Jacki (Lane) Wisher

In her story about about growing up in Garden Home, Jacki Wisher recalls her summer fun at Alpenrose with her two Shetland ponies and pony-drawn cart:

People came from far and wide to fill the Alpenrose grandstands and enjoy the 4th of July Pageant for several evenings which included many costumes, wagons and ponies. They also enjoyed the Alpenrose Western frontier town buildings and other animals, all for FREE. One chapter of the Pageant portrayed each signer of the Declaration of Independence; the huge draw at the end of the Pageant was the awesome Fireworks for the 4th of July!

Jacki and the fifty or more kids participating in the extravaganza all stayed in large tents on the Alpenrose property. Their ponies stayed in the pony barns. They ate their meals in the Alpenrose owners’personal home. Carl and Virginia Cadanou’s home is still on the property. Read more…

Glory, the pony, with Jacki Wisher's sister Kathy Lane as the driver with two neighborhood girls, Nikki and Mari. Probably 1964 or 1965.

Glory, the pony, with Jacki Wisher’s sister Kathy Lane as the driver with two neighborhood girls, Nikki and Mari. Probably 1964 or 1965.

History of the Alpenrose Dairy

Kids from Garden Home frequented the Alpenrose Dairy to participate in baseball, bicycle riding in the velodrome, go-kart racing, Dairyville shops, petting zoo, and annual July 4th extravaganza and fireworks display. Read more…

Quarter midget go-kart racing at Alpenrose

Quarter midget go-kart racing at Alpenrose (source: The Oregonian – 100 years of history at Portland’s Alpenrose Dairy)

New Stories

History of the Portland Golf Club

Established in 1914, the Portland Golf Club is a prestigious private golf club in the Garden Home/Raleigh Hills area. We’ve begun collecting photos and stories about the Portland Golf Club, we hope that you’ll share your stories with us.

Portland Golf Club - original club house

The Portland Golf Club’s original clubhouse stood about where the 7th hole tee is now.

New vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery

Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub and Brewery provided us with a large gallery of vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery. To view the full gallery, see our story on Mark and Leona Whitney and the Whitney Cannery, 1950-1976. Thank you, Shelly!

Garden Home Road Safety Path

The bike and pedestrian path that runs along the north side SW Garden Home Road was built in approximately 1965. Prior to development of the walking path along Garden Home Road, children and others had to walk on the road, dodging cars and endangering their lives. It is remembered that one child was killed on SW Oleson Road. It took several years to fight for and win the approval to build the path. Read the story about the development of the safety path in our story on the Garden Home Road Safety Path.

Construction history of Garden Home School

Don Dunbar, former principal of Garden Home School (1968-1974), provided us with this very interesting diagram explaining the sequence and dates of the various additions to Garden Home School (now the Garden Home Recreation Center). Note the area outlined in black dotted lines is the location of the original school building that was built in 1912 and taken down in 1967. View photos of the school over the years in our work-in-progress story on the history of Garden Home School, 1912 to 1982.

Garden Home School - construction history diagram from Don Dunbar

Garden Home School – construction history diagram from Don Dunbar

1912 Newly constructed Garden Home School

1912 Newly constructed Garden Home School

The Garden Home junction of the Oregon Electric Railway

Read our story on the history of the Garden Home station of the Oregon Electric Railway to view our gallery of vintage photos of the station, including 1936 aerial photos that finally put to rest the exact location of the station. On the photo below, you can clearly see the station building on a raised platform (note the shadows).

1936 Army Corps of Engineers Aerial Photo - Garden Home Railroad Station detail

1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo – Garden Home Railroad Station detail

Garden Home train station - rear

Garden Home train station – rear

Garden Home train station

Garden Home train station

1936 aerial photos of Garden Home area by Army Corps of Engineers – Update

We’ve updated our collection of six 1936 aerial photographs of the Garden Home area taken by the US Army Corps of Engineers to include detailed annotations of landmarks and road names. The annotated versions of the photos make it easier to get your bearings when viewing the 1936 photos.

SW Garden Home intersection and train station - 1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo (annotated)

SW Garden Home intersection and train station – 1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo (annotated)
View the collection of 1936 aerial photographs

Colin Lamb and the history of Lamb’s Garden Home Thriftway – Update

We’ve added some additional vintage photographs and news updates to Colin Lamb’s history of Lamb’s Garden Home Thriftway.

Recent News

Sale of the Alpenrose Dairy

Smith Brothers Farms, a Seattle-area competitor, finalized a deal to purchase Alpenrose on Oct. 14, 2019. The deal did not include 52 acres of community space, where Alpenrose has maintained three Little League baseball fields, a velodrome track, 4-H Discovery Farm and “Dairyville” replica frontier town. Alpenrose will continue producing milk, cottage cheese, and sour cream at the dairy’s facilities on SW Shattuck Road.

Alpenrose Dairy from above

Alpenrose Dairy from above

New display cabinet in the Garden Home Community Library

Garden Home Cooks! When the library re-opens, see our history display in the Garden Home Community Library: Garden Home recipe books by the Garden Home School’s Parent Faculty group, two recipe books from the Methodist Church, Isolda Steele and Shirley Bernard’s wonderful recipe books. The vintage kitchen appliances include the coffee grinder, churn, toaster, chopper and more!

May 2020 Newsletter

GHHP Gazette - May 2020 cover
Thank you for the great comments on our May 2020 Newsletter (PDF). It covers the 10th Anniversary of the Garden Home History Project, COVID19, Garden Home Cooks! display in the library display cabinet, 1936 aerial photograph updates, blooming of the Oleson Gardens, photos of the Garden Home History Project Board of Directors, excerpts from some of our favorite stories from the website, and Garden Home History Through The Years in photos.

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We often begin with slide show presentations. All are welcome to attend our meetings. We’re an active and fun group, we have lots of opportunities to get involved!
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Portland Golf Club

Portland Golf Club - original club house

The Portland Golf Club’s original clubhouse stood about where the 7th hole tee is now.

Established in 1914, the Portland Golf Club is a prestigious private golf club in the Garden Home area. You can read more about the club’s history on the their website.

From the Portland Golf Club’s description of the 15th hole (Firlock Station):

Players will stand on the tee in fear of the large fir approximately 140 yards off the tee with OB to the left. Two good shots are required to set up a short shot into a green which is only 11 yards deep in some areas. A railroad originally bordered this hole. An entire engine and half the car turned over opposite the green in the mid forties. In later years it was a bridle path for The Nicol Academy and Hunt Club (Meyer Estate). Firlock Hole… this was the site of Firlock Station on the old Oregon Electric- the only way to get to the Portland Golf Club prior to 1916.

There are also several stories on GardenHomeHistory.com that discuss the Portland Golf Club.

March 14, 2014 Oregonian article about the history of Portland Golf Club

[source: PDF of the entire issue of the March 12, 2014 Oregonian (warning: 67 MB)]

Historic aerial photos of the Portland Golf Club

We highly recommend reading our wonderful story Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan to learn about the early greens-keepers (1920s to 1950s) and their recollections of the development of the back nine, altering the course of Fanno Creek, improvements to the front nine, and a collection of vintage photos.

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June 2020 Garden Home History Email Update

Hello Friends, we hope you are all well, safe, and finding moments of pleasure in each day. As you have probably noticed, we are trying out a new format for our Email Updates. We hope you like it.

We’d love to include your memoirs and photos of your time in Garden Home, even a single memoir about the school, games you played, your family, etc. Send your comments and memoirs to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com. Please let us know the names any of the Garden Home people shown in the Whitney snapshots (see story below).

As a history organization, we recognize the COVID-19 pandemic is history in the making. The recent protests against police brutality and systemic racism involve thousands of demonstrators here in Portland, and millions of people in the U.S. and around the world. We value, support, and celebrate the diversity in our culture, and particularly in Garden Home.

Thanks to Andy and Shelly Bigley, owners of the Old Market Pub and Brewery, the vintage Garden Home postal safe and the large collection of photos we recently acquired from the former Lamb’s Thriftway (courtesy of Colin Lamb) will soon be on display in the pub.

Visit us at GardenHomeHistory.com.

Tenth Anniversary of the Garden Home History Project

Thank you for your interest, participation, and support over the past ten years. We are looking back at some of our favorite stories and photos during this anniversary year. Please send your stories, photos and memories of Garden Home to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com!

For some great stories about early Garden Home, we recommend you enjoy:

1905, Von Bergens: Magdelana, Andreas holding Frieda, Ida and Elsie standing and Andreas parents

1905, Von Bergens: Magdelana, Andreas holding Frieda, Ida and Elsie standing and Andreas parents.
Courtesy Richard Roth and Madeline Benner.

Andreas and Magdelana Von Bergen Dairy – Recollections of Madeline Benner of the Von Bergen Dairy:

The Von Bergen farm home in the 1920s and 30s was a big two-story house. I slept in a little room on the main floor when I visited. When I would stay overnight with Grandma, I would hear scary noises at night. Finally I learned that walnuts were put upstairs on the floor to dry and I was hearing mice chase the walnuts around. The family received the farm through a donation land claim.

1910 Garden Home baseball team

Late 1920s Garden Home baseball team. #1 Duke Scherner in back.
Courtesy Don Smith.

Don Smith – Don was in second grade when he and his mother, Postmistress Margaret Scherner Smith and his grandmother, Maria Scherner moved back to Garden Home in 1935. Margaret had grown up in Garden Home and is pictured in the 1911 first school class who met overhead in the Nichol’s store. Don caddied at Portland Golf Club as a young man. As caddies, they got to play for free on Monday mornings and on slow days could sneak onto the back nine for a little more time. Don retired as a golf pro.

Fanno Creek Dairy business card

Bob Feldman – Bob grew up on the Fanno Creek Dairy, which was located on the north side of Garden Home Road new SW 92nd Ave. Back in the 1940s, you might have seen young Bob Feldman riding his bike home from Garden Home School precariously toting a pail of slop from the cafeteria to feed his new baby pigs. He sold his first set of 10 weiner pigs and hoped for a new business. “Weiner pigs” are sold young for pork.

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Ross Fogelquist – Ross Fogelquist’s lovely home, called Fogelbo, is next door to Nordia House, the Nordic cultural center on SW Oleson Road. Ross served in different positions at the Swedish Consulate between 1992 and 2007, and retired as the Honorary Swedish Consul for Oregon in 20007.

New Stories

New vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery

Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub and Brewery provided us with a large gallery of vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery. To view the full gallery, see our story on Mark and Leona Whitney and the Whitney Cannery, 1950-1976. Thank you, Shelly!

Garden Home Road Safety Path

The bike and pedestrian path that runs along the north side SW Garden Home Road was built in approximately 1965. Prior to development of the walking path along Garden Home Road, children and others had to walk on the road, dodging cars and endangering their lives. It is remembered that one child was killed on SW Oleson Road. It took several years to fight for and win the approval to build the path. Read the story about the development of the safety path in our story on the Garden Home Road Safety Path.

Construction history of Garden Home School

Don Dunbar, former principal of Garden Home School (1968-1974), provided us with this very interesting diagram explaining the sequence and dates of the various additions to Garden Home School (now the Garden Home Recreation Center). Note the area outlined in black dotted lines is the location of the original school building that was built in 1912 and taken down in 1967. View photos of the school over the years in our work-in-progress story on the history of Garden Home School, 1912 to 1982.

Garden Home School - construction history diagram from Don Dunbar

Garden Home School – construction history diagram from Don Dunbar

1912 Newly constructed Garden Home School

1912 Newly constructed Garden Home School

Memorial benches on the Fanno Creek Trail

Read about the three memorial benches placed along the Fanno Creek Trail honoring Steve Mapes, Peter Herman, and Jeanette and Vernon Fredrickson. There’s a fourth bench located in the memorial garden at SW Oleson Rd and SW 80th Ave memorializing Terry Moore, who led the Garden Home Gardeners and their involvement in the remodeling of SW Oleson Road following the infamous 2007 chainsaw massacre (widening of SW Oleson Road).

Harold Gjerman

Read our story about Harold Gjerman, who has lived in Garden Home since 1970. Harold spent 45 years working for the railroads, and retired in 2004 as a conductor. He is a member of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway Historical Society, and has provided us with important print information about the Oregon Electric and the Garden Home Railroad station and rail lines. These were most helpful in writing captions for the colorized train photos given to Garden Home History by Colin Lamb. We are pleased to have Harold added to our Advisory Board, Garden Home History Project.

The Garden Home junction of the Oregon Electric Railway

Read our story on the history of the Garden Home station of the Oregon Electric Railway to view our gallery of vintage photos of the station, including 1936 aerial photos that finally put to rest the exact location of the station. On the photo below, you can clearly see the station building on a raised platform (note the shadows).

1936 Army Corps of Engineers Aerial Photo - Garden Home Railroad Station detail

1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo – Garden Home Railroad Station detail

Garden Home train station - rear

Garden Home train station – rear

Garden Home train station

Garden Home train station

1936 aerial photos of Garden Home area by Army Corps of Engineers – Update

We’ve updated our collection of six 1936 aerial photographs of the Garden Home area taken by the US Army Corps of Engineers to include detailed annotations of landmarks and road names. The annotated versions of the photos make it easier to get your bearings when viewing the 1936 photos.

SW Garden Home intersection and train station - 1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo (annotated)

SW Garden Home intersection and train station – 1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo (annotated)
View the collection of 1936 aerial photographs

Colin Lamb and the history of Lamb’s Garden Home Thriftway – Update

We’ve added some additional vintage photographs and news updates to Colin Lamb’s history of Lamb’s Garden Home Thriftway.

Upcoming Events

Due to the current public health recommendations in response to the COVID-19 virus, we will not have slide programs until the Garden Home Recreation Center re-opens. We have interesting programs planned for the future. Take good care of yourselves.

We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.
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Rod Harmon obituary

Roger “Rod” Harmon, April 2, 1927 to May 22, 2020

Rod Harmon 1927-2020

Rod Harmon 1927-2020

[Editor: Our local Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District’s Harmon Swim Center on Scholls Ferry Road was named after the highly esteemed long-time coach Rod Harmon.  He recently died at age 93.]

Rod Harman passed away at the age of 93, May 22, 2020. Rod was preceded in death by his wife, Barbara; and daughter, Karen.

Rod had an immense passion for working with students and athletes and dedicated his life to serving others.

Rod was recently featured in The Oregonian which includes many of the accomplishments he achieved in his 93 years of life.

https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2020/05/beaverton-swim-coach-rod-harman-whose-name-graces-an-aquatic-center-dies-at-93.html

In honor of Rod’s memory, and to continue his legacy, the family has established the Coach Rod Harman Memorial Scholarship Fund on GoFundMe. This fund will bestow scholarships to graduating student athletes at Beaverton, Aloha and Southridge High Schools. The family hopes to bless many passionate and dedicated student athletes for years to come, just like Rod would want!

Rod is survived by his sons, Mark (Rhonda) Harman, Scott Harman and Brian (Lucy) Roark; and his seven grandchildren, Tyler, Trevor, Tori, Alex, Evan, Pagie and Max.
Due to the Pandemic, a celebration of life for Rod will be scheduled at a later time.

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