November 2022 News

In this edition: a Fanno Creek Trail History Walk, School Days exhibit in the library, researching a history walk for downtown Garden Home, road closure for roundabout development at SW 92nd Ave and SW Allen Blvd, remembering Andy Dignan, Crystal Steele, and remembering Vlasta Nora Becvar Barber.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. To receive the free newsletter and email Updates, contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

November 2022 Gazette

The November edition of the Gazette has been mailed. You can read the PDF version below. Click on the Gazette to open the six pages of photos and stories.

GHHP Gazette - Nov 2022

GHHP Gazette – Nov 2022 (PDF)

The Big Blow of 1962

Sixty years ago today on October 12, 1962, severe winds blew in Garden Home and all up and down through Oregon. It was declared the nation’s worst national disaster of 1962. Thanks to Steve Bauer for passing along the small book, The Big Blow by Ellis Lucia, The Story of the Pacific Northwest Columbus Day Storm.

Peak wind velocities ranged from 116 mph in Portland to 170 mph at Hebo in Tillamook County. The Big Blow left 500,000 people without power in Oregon and almost $400,000 of damage to our Washington County schools. Some 300 planes were damaged or wrecked. Almost 3,000 stumps had to be removed from Portland parks.

Path of the Big Blow storm 1962

Path of the Big Blow storm 1962

Here in Garden Home, Forrest Lamb had more recently opened his new Thriftway store in 1957. His son Colin Lamb told us how they responded to the storm:

The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the big storm of 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day. I think we got full payment. We lost our perishable food but then we didn’t have as many freezer and refrigerated items as we do now. Most of the produce section was root crops and winter stable foods. We just added up the grocery charges with a pad and pencil at the check stands.

1957 Lamb's Thriftway grand opening. Forrest Lamb stands at first checkout register.

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening. Forrest Lamb stands at first checkout register. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

1957 Lamb's Thriftway grand opening announcement

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening announcement. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

1957 Lamb's Garden Home Thriftway grand opening

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

Jan Fredrickson remembers his experience as a young boy living in Wormwood Manor on Firlock Lane (now SW 78thAve) with his parents:

My dad told me to get inside the house. Mom and Dad ran outside to batten down the hatches. I was seven, all I could remember during an earthquake was to stand in the doorway, which I did. It was like The wizard of Oz. Limbs and trees falling, the house shaking a big boom and flash and the power went out!

My parents were back inside. My dad said sit in front of the fireplace. The whole house could blow away but that won’t move. A locust tree fell from our property and broke the power pole in half and blocked the street. The metal roof blew off the chicken coop. We were 20 days without electricity. Heating, cooking, and heating hot water to take a bath were all done in the fireplace.

I did my homework by candlelight. My mom cooked oxtail stew in a big pot over the fireplace. She found a wood fireplace is much hotter than the electric stove.

My dad was attending Electronics School at Tektronix. He’d fill the front porch with wood so there’d be enough to last until he got home at midnight. He went to his job at Sawyer’s during the day. Came home and again chopped more wood and fallen trees and limbs. The only damage to the house was six shingles came off. Our telephone worked the whole time.

This storm is etched in my mind. It was 60 years ago but seems like it was yesterday.

Wormwood Manor 1962 broken telephone pole and damage from Big Blow on Firlock Ln

Wormwood Manor on Firlock Ln, broken power pole and damage from Big Blow, 1962

We had asked for other stories and were so glad to receive this Oct. 12, 1962 story from Joanne DeHaan. (See Joanne’s wonderful story about the early Portland Golf Club.)

We lived on Mayo at this time. At 4:40 p.m., I put a mac and cheese casserole into the oven and turned to clean the counter. Looking out our large kitchen windows, I saw billowing gray clouds rushing in from the south, pushing each other out of the way as they tumbled towards me. Strong winds rattled the windows and then the electricity went out.

Dave left work at 4:30 in calm weather. By the time he reached Multnomah Boulevard, the wind had knocked down trees and power lines which blocked some roads. He slowly maneuvered through an obstacle course of trees, debris, power lines, and abandoned cars. He heard warnings on the car radio that roofs were blowing off of homes. He was concerned that I might be in danger. He could not get home fast enough.

And, as the wind blew debris against our house, I wondered which room would be safest. I zipped our toddler into his snow suit to keep him warm and moved him and his toys into a north facing room.

When Dave finally got home and opened the garage door, the wind blew out a small garage window. Yes, we could open the garage door without electricity – we always did. Back then, electric garage doors were a luxury that we couldn’t afford.

We didn’t have a battery operated radio. So, we listened to the car radio. Flipping channels, we found one broadcaster after the other talking about the terrible storm, about roofs blown off, and about people being hurt. We were worried.

Finally, we heard the KGW weatherman, Jack Capell. He relayed messages of damage, but with a calm voice, not trying to sensationalize the story. We heard that few roofs blew off, but many shingles did. We didn’t have to worry as much. It was time to think about eating. That cold mac and cheese didn’t taste bad.

It was a dark and stormy night…the strong winds continued into the early morning hours. But we were safe and only had minor damage to our roof. We realized we wouldn’t have electricity for a long time. We had to make plans. We could use some food from the small freezer the next day; but everything else had to be thrown away. Our son had no milk to drink; only water or juice.

We had a large corner fireplace with a raised hearth that worked very well for cooking. Dave’s parents lived just 1 ½ miles away. They could keep warm with their wall gas furnace; but couldn’t cook or drive. I cooked dinner for both families on our fireplace, Dave drove their dinner to them, and then came home to eat.

Like every mother I knew, I used cloth diapers. Disposable diapers were somewhat available; but not at all common or reasonably priced. Since I couldn’t launder them, I carefully considered when to change my toddler.

The whole city was without electricity and phone service. Phone service was restored first; then after a week, the power returned. We were lucky; the neighbors behind us on Stewart Street had to wait another week.

Get Involved

Our Board of Directors continues their monthly meetings, second Mondays at 4:15 in our homes. Call to attend. Current subjects include displays in the Library and bulletin board, Century Homes program (we have some 39 Century Homes in Garden Home), Historic Garden Home street signs, new businesses, our newsletters, program planning with the Garden Home Library and more! More Garden Home History walking Tours. We welcome new volunteers to our committees; let us know your interest. Call Elaine 503-246-5879, or Esta 503-246-5758.

John Pacella, Susan and Stan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler March 2022 crop

John Pacella, Susan and Stan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler March 2022

Sharon Vedder, Esta Mapes, Elaine Shreve, Marie Pacella March 2022 crop

Sharon Vedder, Esta Mapes, Elaine Shreve, Marie Pacella March 2022

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about over 40 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

December 2022 UPDATE – Garden Home History Email

Hello to our Garden Home History Friends, Happy Holidays to you all. Do take care of yourselves and each other. Thank you for your generous donations, your nice comments, and hopefully, your good intentions to share your Garden Home memories with us! If you wish to receive the printed Gazette (3x a year) in addition to your email Gazette, reply with your mailing address.

Remember!

Remember the Big Snow of 1969 and the flocked Christmas trees sold at Whitney’s Cannery (now the site of the Old Market Brew Pub).

Whitney's Cannery - Leona Whitney and CHEER UP IT MUST BE COLDER IN ALASKA sign 1969

Whitney’s Cannery – Leona Whitney and CHEER UP IT MUST BE COLDER IN ALASKA sign 1969

Whitney's Cannery - winter 1969

Whitney’s Cannery – winter 1969

Whitney's Cannery - Flocked Christmas trees - Leona Whitney 1970

Whitney’s Cannery – Flocked Christmas trees – Leona Whitney 1970

Whitney's Cannery - Flocked Christmas trees - Leona Whitney 1968

Whitney’s Cannery – Flocked Christmas trees – Leona Whitney 1968

Discover Garden Home!

Many homes in Garden Home are decorated for this holiday season. If there’s a home with great decorations near you, send us a photo!

2022 Xmas train SW Alden St east of SW 80th

2022 Xmas train SW Alden St east of SW 80th

2022 Santa's sled on SW 84th south of SW Garden Home Rd

2022 Santa’s sled on SW 84th south of SW Garden Home Rd

In Memoriam: Larry Monk

Larry served as Pastor for the Garden Home Community Methodist Church in the 1970s. Their children Danny, David, and Jeannie attended Garden Home School. Larry wrote an article about the Garden Home After-School Care Association here on our website. Read his full obituary.

Linda and Larry Monk, 2013. Larry was pastor at Garden Home Methodist Church in the 1970s.

In Memoriam: Dorothy Johnson Stevens

Dorothy was one of our most famous residents. She has been very generous with her photos and stories for our website. Her son, Peter Papadakos, has sent her obituary from Florida.

1945 Dorothy Johnson in front of Gust Johnnson's gas station, FDR death

1945 Dorothy Johnson in front of Gust Johnnson’s gas station, FDR death.
Courtesy Dorothy Johnson. See post.

Dorothy waving at street sign (now SW 88th Ave)

Dorothy Johnson and father Gust Johnson

Dorothy Johnson winning Miss Oregon 1955

Dorothy Johnson winning Miss Oregon 1955, Astorian Budget photo.
Courtesy Dorothy Johnson. See post.

Dorothy Johnson and Pat Boone, 1958

Dorothy Johnson Stevens and Pat Boone – 2017

Reader Feedback

We appreciate the feedback we receive from you, our readers. For example, we received an email from Gary Jacquemin remembering when he took piano lessons from Mrs. Fogelquist at Fogelbo.

I’ll never forget my anticipation each week on the day which I road my bike down Garden Home Road to that very beautiful home where Mrs Fogelquist taught piano lessons!
With great anticipation, I’d park my bike behind her home, and upon knocking on her door, I was warmly welcomed into her house. Without hesitation, I would open my backpack, and arrange my music sheets. I’d attempt to play the music assignments for the week, and if she was satisfied, embark upon a trial performance of next week’s assignment. This period of time lasted about 3 years, as I recall, and those days will always be remembered fondly as my introduction to the remarkable sensation of being able to make music, even at my early years, and has remained with now as I practice and enjoy the music! I’m forever grateful for those years past!

– Gary Jacquemin

Get Involved

Our Board of Directors continues their monthly meetings, second Mondays at 4:15 in our homes. Call to attend. Current subjects include Fanno Creek Trail History Walks, displays in the Library and bulletin board, Century Homes program (we have some 39 Century Homes in Garden Home), Historic Garden Home street signs, new businesses, our newsletters, program planning with the Garden Home Library and more! We welcome new volunteers to our committees; let us know your interest. Call Elaine 503-246-5879, or Esta 503-246-5758.

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Call us: Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691. To unsubscribe, reply to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com with “UNSUBSCRIBE” in the subject line.

Stay safe and well, from all of our dedicated Board of Directors: Esta Mapes, Sharon Vedder, John and Marie Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Mickey Lindsay, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler, and Elaine Shreve. Tom Shreve is our webmaster.

– Elaine

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Posted in Email updates | Leave a comment

Dorothy Mae Johnson (Papadakos) (White) Stevens obituary

Dorothy Johnson Stevens

Dorothy Johnson Stevens

Ormond Beach, FL – Dorothy Mae Stevens of Daytona Beach, FL passed away on April 7, 2022, in view of her beloved Atlantic Ocean at the age of 85. Born in 1936, Dorothy Mae was the youngest of two daughters of Borghild and Gustaf Johnson of Superior, Wisconsin. When she was 5, the family headed west on the Lewis and Clark Trail to Oregon in a two-door Ford pickup truck. She would say this was their modern version of a covered wagon. In Garden Home, Oregon Gust took over a Texaco Gas Station where Dorothy Mae grew up pumping gas while her mother ran the office and taught second grade.

Her modeling and beauty career began in 8th grade when she became a Junior model for Jantzen swimsuits. In her junior year at Beaverton High School, she was elected Spring Reign Queen and shortly after graduation she was chosen Miss Beaverton 1955 and went on to win the 1955 Miss Oregon Pageant. She was chaperoned by her mother at the 1956 Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, notable as the first year the pageant was broadcast live on national television; the first year Bert Parks was emcee; and the first year Parks sang his iconic song, “There She is, Miss America”. In the Miss America Talent Competition, Dorothy Mae performed Lady Macbeth’s “Sleepwalking Scene” from William Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, Hers was the only Talent performance to be televised and would help her win First Runner-Up to Miss America, the best finish for an Oregon contestant until Katie Harman won Miss America in 2002.

Dorothy Mae would say that her proudest achievement was being named “Miss Leatherneck” by the US Marine Corps in 1956 after she traveled promoting the Marines. To this day she remains the only Miss Leatherneck in the Corps’ 246 year history.

The Miss America Scholarship Program enabled Dorothy Mae to study at the America Academy of Dramatic Arts in NYC which she left after one year to pursue movie offers in Hollywood. Her film credits include “The Joker is Wild” (1957), “Bernardine” (1957, Pat Boone’s first Hollywood film), “Summer Love” (1958), “Life Begins at 17” (1958), “The Littlest Hobo” (1958) and “The Flying Fontaines” (1959). Her TV credits included regular appearances on the “Bob Cummings Show” and “Bat Masterson” with Gene Barry. In March 1958, Dorothy Mae and her mother accompanied Conrad Hilton to Cuba for the opening of the Havana Hilton Hotel just four months before Castro came to power.

In 1959 Dorothy Mae met her future husband Peter James Papadakos, founder of Gyrodyne Helicopter Company on Long Island, NY with whom she had three children: Dorothy Jean, Peter and Athena. In 1969, Dorothy Mae and her children relocated to Reno, Nevada where she married Dr. Paul L. White, an Obstetrician/Gynecologist and Emergency Room physician who co-founded Planned Parenthood of Northern Nevada. She and Paul welcomed her fourth child, Andrew. Her 3rd husband, George Stevens, a retired Marine of Grand Prairie, TX passed away in 2002 and Dorothy Mae returned to Florida where she was active as a nurse practitioner and senior ombudsman while still answering movie fan mail well into her 80’s.

Dorothy Mae is survived by her children Dorothy Jean Papadakos (Tracy), Peter P. Papadakos (Barbara), Athena P. Papadakos (Scott) and Andrew J. White and grandchildren Alexander (Suzanne), Mitchell, Morgan and Maxfield. A private family service was held on April 15 in Florida with committal to follow in Oregon.

Donations in Dorothy Mae’s name can be made to the American Cancer Society.

[Editor: Dorothy was one of our most famous residents. She has been very generous with her photos and stories for our website. Her son, Peter Papadakos, has sent this obituary from Florida.]

Posted in Obituaries | Tagged | 2 Comments

Larry Monk obituary

Larry Monk

Larry Monk, 2013

March 2, 1933 to October 11, 2022

Larry, age 89, died peacefully in bed next to his wife of 52 years.

Larry graduated from Willamette University in 1955 and from Drew University Seminary in 1958. Larry was a minister in the United Methodist Church from 1959-1997; he served congregations all over Oregon.

Larry had courage and integrity; he showed friendship and kindness to all he encountered. He lived his values and was a positive force serving as a role model of how to live as a good human being. Larry received a lifesaving donated kidney from his sister Lenore in 1981; he cared for this gift for the next 41 years. Larry refused to worry about things he couldn’t control and always believed the best outcome was going to happen.

Larry is survived by his wife, Linda; sisters, Lois Welch and Lenore Monk; eight children, Cheryl Gertz (Ken), Daryl Monk (Julie), Tanya Mounts (Brent), Laurie Fuglee, Jeannie Monk (Tim), Daniel Monk-Kowalsky, David Kowalsky (Cindy) and Casey Christopher (Julie); 18 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

[Editor: Larry served as Pastor for the Garden Home Community Methodist Church in the 1970s. Their children Danny, David, and Jeannie attended Garden Home School. Larry wrote an article about the Garden Home After-School Care Association here on our website.]

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Patty Bonney obituary

Patty Bonney 2018

Patty Bonney 2018

October 17, 1930 to October 22, 2022

Particia Haines Woodard Bonney was born October 17, 1930 in Great Falls, Montana to Francis D Haines Sr and Plesah Macdonald joining siblings Francis Jr and Marjory. The family was often on the move as her dad moved up in the teaching ranks and pursued his doctorate in history UC Berkeley. They also spent many summers traveling as he researched projects and collected Indian artifacts. With all of the moves, Mom rarely spent more than one year at a school. She graduated from Lewiston High School in Idaho at age 16.

Mom married her first husband, Elvin Woodard, at age 17 and had her first child, Ken, one month after turning 18. Twenty months later Keith was added to the family with Carolyn arriving twenty months after that. By that time, 1953, Mom and the three kids moved to Monmouth Oregon where her dad was Chair of the History Department at the then Oregon College of Education now Western Oregon University. In 1956, Mom moved to Portland and began working in the Portland State College (PSU) Registrar’s Office. The kids moved up and attended Shattuck Grade School from 1956 to 1960 when the family moved to Garden Home after Mom married William ‘Bill’ Bonney.

Mom and Dad made two additions to the family with Alan in 1964 and Regina in 1966. Ken was in the last 8th grade class at Garden Home while Keith and Carolyn were the first 8th and 7th grade classes at Whitford Junior High. Carolyn was in the first 9th grade class at Whitford. All five kids graduated from GH with four of us attending Whitford and then all five off to Beaverton HS

Dad/Bill had bought two adjoining properties on Oleson Road in 1958 which totaled about 2.5 acres. The house was originally a horse stable that had been converted to a house. It was a tight fit but we made it work. The area behind the house was wooded and swampy but made for a great play area and a shortcut to Alden and our friends who lived in that direction.

Bill passed away in 1976. Mom was determined to stay on the property and did so for 62 years. Ken bought one of the two properties and built a house next door. The growth and changes in Garden Home and along Oleson Road as with most things had some good and some not so good effects. Sidewalks a plus, traffic not so much, etc.

To stay busy and useful, Mom volunteered at Garden Home School helping many kids with their reading and connecting with many of the staff and faculty. She also joined multiple groups with varied interests (knitting, square dancing, extension, etc) and set about traveling the country and the world. She was an avid reader her whole life beginning at the age of three and wanted to explore all of the wonderful places she had spent a lifetime reading about. She made many trips culminating with a nine month trip around the world making friends along the way.

Mom was an active member of the First Congregational Church on the park blocks in Portland for 64 years where she taught Sunday school for many years. She loved riding the bus wherever her destination might be. She was known by many as the knitting lady, others knew her as the cookie lady. Her favorite building in Portland besides her church was the Multnomah County Library with its thousands of books and therefore horizons to explore.

Mom passed away Saturday October 22. She leaves behind all five children, two grandchildren, and eight great grandchildren along with nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.

[Thank you to Keith Woodard for writing the above about his mother. Read more about Patty Bonney in our story Patty Bonney and son Ken Woodard.]

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged | 3 Comments

Barbara Ann Green obituary

Barbara Ann Green

Barbara Ann Green

December 11, 1931 to October 20, 2022

Barbara was born in Los Angeles, Calif., in December 1931 to Willis and Barbara Kiggins. The family soon moved back to Portland and stayed there the rest of their lives.
She started school in kindergarten at Garden Home, Ore., and began her long love of education. Moving frequently during the depression, she attended six grade schools and chose Girls Polytechnic for high school because she could live anywhere in the city. At the time the family lived in Vanport. She became best friends with Violet Miller and together became co-editors of the school paper.

With help from the faculty and obtaining good grades, she obtained scholarships for Vanport College and began her trek for a teaching career. Other colleges attended were OCE and OSU for her Masters. She began teaching at Sunnyside grade school, married O. Maborn Green and had three sons. After all three sons were in school, she taught at Marysville grade school and lastly at Whitman grade school. She loved her job.
She is survived by her sons, Ken, Mike and Don; grandchildren, Christina Peterslie (Steve) and Sean Green; two great-granddaughters, Haley and Samantha Peterslie; sister, Katherine Hamburg; nephew, Mark Hamburg; niece, Anne Hamburg; and great-nephews, Ryan Hamburg and Todd Endres. Her husband of over 50 years, O. Maborn Green, died Feb. 18, 2004.

Please read a book to a child in her memory.

[Read more about Barbara Ann Green in our story Barbara Kiggins Green memoir.]

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged | 1 Comment

Helen Winberg obituary

Helen Winberg

Helen Winberg

February 13, 1934 to September 19, 2022

Helen Dawna (Hays) Winberg “graduated” into her eternal rest laughing with her “granddaughter” Windy, on the evening of Sept. 19, 2022. She was born to Chester and Marjorie Hays at Emanuel Hospital in Portland, Ore., Feb. 13, 1934.

Helen first attended Gilbert grade school in Portland, then the family moved to Yachats, Ore., where she attended Yachats grade school and graduated from Waldport High School in 1951. She was co-valedictorian with her best friend, Dorothy Thissell. Helen married the young man next door, “Cliff” Winberg in September 1951, across the street in the Little Log Church. They made their home in Yachats while adding the first two of their children. Then the family moved to Beaverton and then to Portland after their third child was born. Helen went to work for the Beaverton School district as a school cook, cooking at several schools including Garden Home, Barnes, Terra Linda, and Raliegh Hills grade schools. She retired in 1993.

Helen led a Blue Bird troop in her home and continued with the Campfire Girls program until the girls graduated.

After retirement and her husband’s death in 1997, Helen traveled extensively for several years, earning the nickname, “Roaming Gnome.” When she wasn’t traveling, she became involved with the West Hills Covenant church, where she helped organize meals, and serve for coffee hour. She was also able to go on short missions to Central and South America through the church, she volunteered to mentor young mothers in recovery, and volunteered at the local food bank.

Helen was predeceased by her son, Stuart; and her husband, Charles “Cliff” Winberg. She is survived by her sister, Haysel Pankey (Gary) of LaPine; daughter, Dawna Kennedy (Martin), of St. Helens; son, Nicholas of Redding, Calif.; grandsons, Ryan and Scott Patrick; granddaughters, Colleen Koch, Alex WinUss and Windy Patrick; five great grandchildren; a niece and nephew and numerous cousins. Helen was a good friend to many and will be greatly missed.

The celebration of Life for Helen will be held at 2:30 p.m., Nov. 20, 2022, at the West Hills Covenant Church, 5815 S.W. Gilchrest Ct., Portland, OR 97221.

In lieu of flowers Helen has requested a donation to the West Hills church for a handicap accessible door.

[Read more about Helen in our story Cafeteria Favorites.]

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged | 2 Comments

October 2022 UPDATE – Garden Home History Email

Hello Friends! Garden Home is busy! This update includes stories about the Big Blow storm of 1962.

Thank you for your generous donations, your nice comments, and hopefully, your good intentions to write us a story about your family! If you wish to receive the printed Gazette (3x a year) in addition to your email Gazette, reply with your mailing address.

The Big Blow of 1962

Sixty years ago today on October 12, 1962, severe winds blew in Garden Home and all up and down through Oregon. It was declared the nation’s worst national disaster of 1962. Thanks to Steve Bauer for passing along the small book, The Big Blow by Ellis Lucia, The Story of the Pacific Northwest Columbus Day Storm.

Peak wind velocities ranged from 116 mph in Portland to 170 mph at Hebo in Tillamook County. The Big Blow left 500,000 people without power in Oregon and almost $400,000 of damage to our Washington County schools. Some 300 planes were damaged or wrecked. Almost 3,000 stumps had to be removed from Portland parks.

Path of the Big Blow storm 1962

Path of the Big Blow storm 1962

Here in Garden Home, Forrest Lamb had more recently opened his new Thriftway store in 1957. His son Colin Lamb told us how they responded to the storm:

The electricity was off in the Garden Home area for about a week after the big storm of 1962. Of course, many homes had no heat so Dad left the presto logs out in the front of the store with a note to pay for them the next day. I think we got full payment. We lost our perishable food but then we didn’t have as many freezer and refrigerated items as we do now. Most of the produce section was root crops and winter stable foods. We just added up the grocery charges with a pad and pencil at the check stands.

1957 Lamb's Thriftway grand opening. Forrest Lamb stands at first checkout register.

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening. Forrest Lamb stands at first checkout register. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

1957 Lamb's Thriftway grand opening announcement

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening announcement. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

1957 Lamb's Garden Home Thriftway grand opening

1957 Lamb’s Thriftway grand opening. Courtesy Colin Lamb. See post.

Jan Fredrickson remembers his experience as a young boy living in Wormwood Manor on Firlock Lane (now SW 78thAve) with his parents:

My dad told me to get inside the house. Mom and Dad ran outside to batten down the hatches. I was seven, all I could remember during an earthquake was to stand in the doorway, which I did. It was like The wizard of Oz. Limbs and trees falling, the house shaking a big boom and flash and the power went out!

My parents were back inside. My dad said sit in front of the fireplace. The whole house could blow away but that won’t move. A locust tree fell from our property and broke the power pole in half and blocked the street. The metal roof blew off the chicken coop. We were 20 days without electricity. Heating, cooking, and heating hot water to take a bath were all done in the fireplace.

I did my homework by candlelight. My mom cooked oxtail stew in a big pot over the fireplace. She found a wood fireplace is much hotter than the electric stove.

My dad was attending Electronics School at Tektronix. He’d fill the front porch with wood so there’d be enough to last until he got home at midnight. He went to his job at Sawyer’s during the day. Came home and again chopped more wood and fallen trees and limbs. The only damage to the house was six shingles came off. Our telephone worked the whole time.

This storm is etched in my mind. It was 60 years ago but seems like it was yesterday.

Wormwood Manor 1962 broken telephone pole and damage from Big Blow on Firlock Ln

Wormwood Manor on Firlock Ln, broken power pole and damage from Big Blow, 1962

We had asked for other stories and were so glad to receive this Oct. 12, 1962 story from Joanne DeHaan. (See Joanne’s wonderful story about the early Portland Golf Club.)

We lived on Mayo at this time. At 4:40 p.m., I put a mac and cheese casserole into the oven and turned to clean the counter. Looking out our large kitchen windows, I saw billowing gray clouds rushing in from the south, pushing each other out of the way as they tumbled towards me. Strong winds rattled the windows and then the electricity went out.

Dave left work at 4:30 in calm weather. By the time he reached Multnomah Boulevard, the wind had knocked down trees and power lines which blocked some roads. He slowly maneuvered through an obstacle course of trees, debris, power lines, and abandoned cars. He heard warnings on the car radio that roofs were blowing off of homes. He was concerned that I might be in danger. He could not get home fast enough.

And, as the wind blew debris against our house, I wondered which room would be safest. I zipped our toddler into his snow suit to keep him warm and moved him and his toys into a north facing room.

When Dave finally got home and opened the garage door, the wind blew out a small garage window. Yes, we could open the garage door without electricity – we always did. Back then, electric garage doors were a luxury that we couldn’t afford.

We didn’t have a battery operated radio. So, we listened to the car radio. Flipping channels, we found one broadcaster after the other talking about the terrible storm, about roofs blown off, and about people being hurt. We were worried.

Finally, we heard the KGW weatherman, Jack Capell. He relayed messages of damage, but with a calm voice, not trying to sensationalize the story. We heard that few roofs blew off, but many shingles did. We didn’t have to worry as much. It was time to think about eating. That cold mac and cheese didn’t taste bad.

It was a dark and stormy night…the strong winds continued into the early morning hours. But we were safe and only had minor damage to our roof. We realized we wouldn’t have electricity for a long time. We had to make plans. We could use some food from the small freezer the next day; but everything else had to be thrown away. Our son had no milk to drink; only water or juice.

We had a large corner fireplace with a raised hearth that worked very well for cooking. Dave’s parents lived just 1 ½ miles away. They could keep warm with their wall gas furnace; but couldn’t cook or drive. I cooked dinner for both families on our fireplace, Dave drove their dinner to them, and then came home to eat.

Like every mother I knew, I used cloth diapers. Disposable diapers were somewhat available; but not at all common or reasonably priced. Since I couldn’t launder them, I carefully considered when to change my toddler.

The whole city was without electricity and phone service. Phone service was restored first; then after a week, the power returned. We were lucky; the neighbors behind us on Stewart Street had to wait another week.

Get Involved

Our Board of Directors continues their monthly meetings, second Mondays at 4:15 in our homes. Call to attend. Current subjects include Fanno Creek Trail History Walks, displays in the Library and bulletin board, Century Homes program (we have some 39 Century Homes in Garden Home), Historic Garden Home street signs, new businesses, our newsletters, program planning with the Garden Home Library and more! We welcome new volunteers to our committees; let us know your interest. Call Elaine 503-246-5879, or Esta 503-246-5758.

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Call us: Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691. To unsubscribe, reply to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com with “UNSUBSCRIBE” in the subject line.

Stay safe and well, from all of our dedicated Board of Directors: Esta Mapes, Sharon Vedder, John and Marie Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Mickey Lindsay, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler, and Elaine Shreve. Tom Shreve is our webmaster.

– Elaine

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Posted in Email updates | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

September 2022 News

In this edition: a Fanno Creek Trail History Walk, School Days exhibit in the library, researching a history walk for downtown Garden Home, road closure for roundabout development at SW 92nd Ave and SW Allen Blvd, remembering Andy Dignan, Crystal Steele, and remembering Vlasta Nora Becvar Barber.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. To receive the free newsletter and email Updates, contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Fanno Creek Trail History Walk

Saturday, September 24, 10AM to noon. History WALK on the Fanno Creek Trail. All spaces are filled for this date; register for a future walk on the Garden Home Library’s website. You’ll hear about:

Olympic swimmers practiced in Garden Home. Ride the train out to Firlock Station to play golf. Catch the mail bag thrown from the postal train, 30 trains or more a day through Garden Home. Ride your horse on the Bridle Path to the horse Academies. See the Onion King bragging about his huge onions. Play with the frogs and lizards in the ponds along the rail bed. Pick up the latest newsletters and other news.

We have done two WALKS sharing the history of the path and the adjoining properties. Our webmaster Tom Shreve does the first half of the trail (and a few comments from Elaine!). Then Heather Waisanen from the Garden Home Library shares the rest of the trail. The Oregon Electric train began clanging along here in 1908, opening Garden Home to so many exciting events.

Historical Display Case in the Garden Home Library

Check out the Historical Display case in the Garden Home Library: It’s all about Garden Home School days. See the Beaverton newspaper announcing the sad news of the closure of Garden Home Elementary School.

2022-09 Display cabinet - School Days

2022-09 Display cabinet – School Days

2022-09 Display cabinet - School Days, top shelf

2022-09 Display cabinet – School Days, top shelf

We’re researching a History Walk for downtown Garden Home

If you have a story about early Garden Home, please send your story to us. For example, Rick Newton sent us a wonderful story about his years growing up in Garden Home: The Newton Boys. Another example is the early writers’ group that met with Dorothy Bastien, who lived on Oleson near the major intersection. A member of the writer’s group, Peg Bracken, wrote several fun books including On Getting Old for the First Time. “The older you get, the more complicated the things you have to work with.” Yes, we agree. She achieved considerable fame with The I Hate to Cook Book. Grab a cream of chicken or mushroom soup can and some leftovers for a quick supper, such as “Skid Road Stroganoff”. “Some women, it is said, like to cook. This book is not for them.” You’ll enjoy these books, which are available from Garden Home Library or your local library.

Road closure for roundabout development at SW 92nd Ave. and SW Allen Blvd.

Yes, we’re all learning new ways to navigate out of Garden Home while SW 92nd Ave is closed for construction. Now that it’s difficult to access SW Allen Blvd from Garden Home, use the ramps onto Hwy 217 at SW Hall Blvd or SW Greenburg Rd instead.  Your Vista Brook neighbors will appreciate it if you avoid cutting through their neighborhood. See City of Beaverton Traffic Alerts for details.

In Memoriam: Andy Friedle Dignan, 1932-2022

Andy Friedle Dignan

Andy Friedle Dignan

Andy Dignan was a great help for us when we first began Garden Home History. Her obituary tells her fascinating story.

Crystal Steele

Crystal Steele and street sign

Crystal Steele and street sign

Ever wonder where the street names come from? In this current photo, Crystal Steele is pointing to the street sign with her name on SW 87th Ave. Interestingly, there is only a foot path where the street should be. She was the youngest of the Steele children who grew up in the house which was at 8085 S.W. Westgard in the early 20th Century. Read Jack Steele’s story on our website.

"Jack

Remembering Vlasta Nora Becvar Barber

Vlasta Nora Barber, age 95, of Tigard, Oregon passed away on Thursday, May 12, 2022. Vlasta was born December 7, 1926 in Maplewood, Oregon. Vlasta attended Garden Home School. Read our article about Vlasta.

Remember!

Remember the Big Blow 60 years ago, on Columbus Day? We’re writing that story next month, let us know how your family handled it. For example, I was the evening nurse in charge of the post-op patients’ ward at Good Samaritan Hospital. The lights going out signaled that the various suctioning devices for my patients were not working. I took a quick trip down the dark stairway, three floors down, to get a large manual suction device I could use for the ‘most needful’ patient. The phones remained working and my son’s babysitter assured me they were fine.

Discover Garden Home!

Check out our Garden Home Library’s new books about old houses.

Library recommendations - Discovering the history of your neighborhood

Library recommendations – Discovering the history of your neighborhood

Get Involved

Our Board of Directors continues their monthly meetings, second Mondays at 4:15 in our homes. Call to attend. Current subjects include displays in the Library and bulletin board, Century Homes program (we have some 39 Century Homes in Garden Home), Historic Garden Home street signs, new businesses, our newsletters, program planning with the Garden Home Library and more! More Garden Home History walking Tours. We welcome new volunteers to our committees; let us know your interest. Call Elaine 503-246-5879, or Esta 503-246-5758.

John Pacella, Susan and Stan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler March 2022 crop

John Pacella, Susan and Stan Houseman, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler March 2022

Sharon Vedder, Esta Mapes, Elaine Shreve, Marie Pacella March 2022 crop

Sharon Vedder, Esta Mapes, Elaine Shreve, Marie Pacella March 2022

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about over 40 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

September 2022 UPDATE – Garden Home History Email

Hello Friends! Garden Home is busy! This update includes a Fanno Creek Trail History Walk, School Days exhibit in the library, researching a history walk for downtown Garden Home, road closure for roundabout development at SW 92nd Ave. and SW Allen Blvd., and remembering Andy Dignan.

Thank you for your generous donations, your nice comments, and hopefully, your good intentions to write us a story about your family! If you wish to receive the printed Gazette (3x a year) in addition to your email Gazette, reply with your mailing address.

Fanno Creek Trail History Walk

Saturday, September 24, 10AM to noon. History WALK on the Fanno Creek Trail. All spaces are filled for this date; register for a future walk on the Garden Home Library’s website. You’ll hear about:

Olympic swimmers practiced in Garden Home. Ride the train out to Firlock Station to play golf. Catch the mail bag thrown from the postal train, 30 trains or more a day through Garden Home. Ride your horse on the Bridle Path to the horse Academies. See the Onion King bragging about his huge onions. Play with the frogs and lizards in the ponds along the rail bed. Pick up the latest newsletters and other news.

We have done two WALKS sharing the history of the path and the adjoining properties. Our webmaster Tom Shreve does the first half of the trail (and a few comments from Elaine!). Then Heather Waisanen from the Garden Home Library shares the rest of the trail. The Oregon Electric train began clanging along here in 1908, opening Garden Home to so many exciting events.

Historical Display Case in the Garden Home Library

Check out the Historical Display case in the Garden Home Library: It’s all about Garden Home School days. See the Beaverton newspaper announcing the sad news of the closure of Garden Home Elementary School.

2022-09 Display cabinet - School Days

2022-09 Display cabinet – School Days

2022-09 Display cabinet - School Days, top shelf

2022-09 Display cabinet – School Days, top shelf

We’re researching a History Walk for downtown Garden Home

If you have a story about early Garden Home, please send your story to us. For example, Rick Newton sent us a wonderful story about his years growing up in Garden Home: The Newton Boys. Another example is the early writers’ group that met with Dorothy Bastien, who lived on Oleson near the major intersection. A member of the writer’s group, Peg Bracken, wrote several fun books including On Getting Old for the First Time. “The older you get, the more complicated the things you have to work with.” Yes, we agree. She achieved considerable fame with The I Hate to Cook Book. Grab a cream of chicken or mushroom soup can and some leftovers for a quick supper, such as “Skid Road Stroganoff”. “Some women, it is said, like to cook. This book is not for them.” You’ll enjoy these books, which are available from Garden Home Library or your local library.

Road closure for roundabout development at SW 92nd Ave. and SW Allen Blvd.

Yes, we’re all learning new ways to navigate out of Garden Home while SW 92nd Ave is closed for construction. Now that it’s difficult to access SW Allen Blvd from Garden Home, use the ramps onto Hwy 217 at SW Hall Blvd or SW Greenburg Rd instead.  Your Vista Brook neighbors will appreciate it if you avoid cutting through their neighborhood. See City of Beaverton Traffic Alerts for details.

In Memoriam: Andy Friedle Dignan, 1932-2022

Andy Friedle Dignan

Andy Friedle Dignan

Andy Dignan was a great help for us when we first began Garden Home History. Her obituary tells her fascinating story.

Remember!

Remember the Big Blow 60 years ago, on Columbus Day? We’re writing that story next month, let us know how your family handled it. For example, I was the evening nurse in charge of the post-op patients’ ward at Good Samaritan Hospital. The lights going out signaled that the various suctioning devices for my patients were not working. I took a quick trip down the dark stairway, three floors down, to get a large manual suction device I could use for the ‘most needful’ patient. The phones remained working and my son’s babysitter assured me they were fine.

Discover Garden Home!

Check out our Garden Home Library’s new books about old houses.

Library recommendations - Discovering the history of your neighborhood

Library recommendations – Discovering the history of your neighborhood

Get Involved

Our Board of Directors continues their monthly meetings, second Mondays at 4:15 in our homes. Call to attend. Current subjects include displays in the Library and bulletin board, Century Homes program (we have some 39 Century Homes in Garden Home), Historic Garden Home street signs, new businesses, our newsletters, program planning with the Garden Home Library and more! More Garden Home History walking Tours. We welcome new volunteers to our committees; let us know your interest. Call Elaine 503-246-5879, or Esta 503-246-5758.

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Call us: Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691. To unsubscribe, reply to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com with “UNSUBSCRIBE” in the subject line.

Stay safe and well, from all of our dedicated Board of Directors: Esta Mapes, Sharon Vedder, John and Marie Pacella, Stan and Susan Houseman, Mickey Lindsay, Jan Fredrickson, Kevin Mistler, and Elaine Shreve. Tom Shreve is our webmaster.

– Elaine

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Posted in Email updates | Tagged | Leave a comment