September 2020 News

In this edition: Old Market Pub and Brewery, Demolition of George log home, New housing developments, Windmill fun, 1981 Thriftway opening flyer, Railway bed on Middelbrooks’ property off SW 71st Ave.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.
Thanks to each one of you for letting us know about your Garden Home history artifacts, old photos, stories, history books, or how you might be able to help document our history. We have a wonderful community because we have caring people!

Upcoming Events

Due to the current public health recommendations in response to the COVID-19 virus, we will not have slide programs until the Garden Home Recreation Center re-opens. We have interesting programs planned for the future. Take good care of yourselves.

In the meantime, sign up for our free Monthly Update Email by sending your contact information to GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com.

News

Pumpkins in Garden Home: We’re hoping that your tomatoes are ripening, that you and your family are well, that children are getting ready for a creative new school year, and that everyone has had some fun this summer. Here is a wonderful front yard pumpkin patch seen in Garden Home the first of September!

Garden Home pumpkins Sep 1, 2020

Garden Home pumpkins Sep 1, 2020

Old Market Pub and Brewery: Thanks to the very generous offer from Andy and Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub to display some of our artifacts from the Garden Home Thriftway. Stop in for takeout, dine-in, a drink, some pizza, or a sandwich, and check out our two photos from the 1905 Lewis & Clark Centennial in Portland. The vintage Garden Home postal safe and the three train reliefs are also there. Stan Houseman also snagged the huge Post Office eagle and postal schedule which will go up soon. Thanks to Stan for moving this project along and to Colin Lamb for the photos and train reliefs. Elaine Shreve wrote the histories for all of the photos and reliefs. Old Market Pub and Brewery: 6959 SW Multnomah Blvd, 503-244-2337.

Historic Log Home Demolished: We were sorry to see the Judy George log home falling to the demolition bulldozer. This log home on SW 87th Ave. (south of Garden Home Road) was built in 1900 on what was then called Westgard Street. This modest house had been added to until it was not salvageable. The lot is being prepared for its new home.

Log house construction

New Housing Developments: You have probably noticed the two large housing developments on SW Garden Home Road. Both the Piper Ridge development at SW 87th Ave. and the Garden Home Estates between SW 81st Ave. and SW 78th Ave. will each have 9 new homes developed by Westwood Homes (plus the original homes on the respective lots). Both properties were previously large pastures with horses in the last century. Early Garden Home was platted with large lots for typical family needs such as a cow, chickens, fruit trees, pasture, and a garden.

Windmill Fun: The original windmill photo from Shirley Gertsch Bartels was so washed out that you could hardly see these two men from Shattuck Dairy having fun. Thanks to David Delgado, a new resident who offered to improve some of our vintage photos, you can enjoy the fun…and bravado…from these men!

Shattuck Dairy - showing off on windmill used to pump water - edited by David Delgado

Shattuck Dairy – showing off on windmill used to pump water – edited by David Delgado

Thriftway Opening in 1981: Thanks to Bob and Sharon Cram for sharing this flyer from 1981 and helping us to clarify the Thriftway dates. The current 1995 store building with the bell tower was added on to this 1981 building. Read the story about the history of Lamb’s Thriftway.

1981 flyer for new Thriftway

1981 flyer for new Thriftway

Have you noticed the old rail bed at SW 71st Ave.? A new story about the southern rail line carving through Garden Home and the Middlebrooks’ property will soon tell its story.

Middlebrooks railway bed entry at SW 71st

Middlebrooks railway bed entry at SW 71st

New Stories

Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan

All about the DeHaan’s and other families who lived on Fanno Creek and SW 92nd Ave and worked the grounds of the Portland Golf Club down through the years, with wonderful vintage photos. See Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan.

Moving a Tree - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis and John DeHaan, moving a tree at the golf course.

Alvas Car - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis’ homemade car, pictured on his father’s farm.

Murals on Scotty’s Restaurant

Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout? This photo shows the back wall in 2011, we’d love to have photos of the other two murals also. We also have a 1912 B.P.O.E. postcard, courtesy of Shirley Gertsch-Bartels. The card was used to direct the order of delivered milk from the Gertsch’s Shattuck Dairy in 1912. Remember when the Elks Lodge used the upstairs over Scotty’s restaurant? We’d love to learn more about that!

Scotty's back mural

Scotty’s back mural

1912 postcard BPOE invite - front

1912 postcard BPOE invite

Century Homes research continues

We appreciate the many Century Homes that lend substance, beauty, and history to Garden Home. Stan Houseman is developing photos and lists of these homes for future documentation. In time, these home owners will be notified by mail regarding their interest to participate. We believe our oldest home was built in 1890 and we have just over 100 homes built before 1930. Please contact Stan if you have an older home or know of one in Garden Home, Housemanquality@yahoo.com.

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

John & Dawn, True Love cement mystery

When Melissa and Josh Stefanic-Grimsbo tore off the old wooden steps of their 1930s log cabin home at 8550 SW Garden Home Road, they found a cement pad with the touching John & Dawn, True Love scratched into the cement. Does anyone know who might have lived there after the 1930s?

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

Garden Home History board members at work

Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, researching railroad history, and more stories to come! Here are some Garden Home Board members at work for our community.

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway - 2020

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway – 2020

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb's Thriftway closing 2019

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb’s Thriftway closing 2019

Marie Pacella, Treasurer - 2020

Marie Pacella, Treasurer – 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask - 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask – 2020

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We often begin with slide show presentations. All are welcome to attend our meetings. We’re an active and fun group, we have lots of opportunities to get involved!
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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Warren F. Cook obituary

Warren F. Cook, June 16, 1946 to August 28, 2020

Retired MCSO Captain Warren Cook passed away in Portland Aug. 28, 2020 after suffering years of complications following an accident.

Warren was born June 16, 1946 in Portland to Ernest and Melba Cook. While attending the University of Portland, he found his beloved Charlotte after throwing a snowball at her and they remained a loving couple for 56 years. The greatest blessing of their lives is their son Albert, and Warren’s time spent with Albert were his most treasured moments. Through the years, many other young men would come to think of Warren as a great father figure and call him Dad.

He proudly served the Multnomah Country Sheriffs Office for 32 years having commanded each of the County’s jails at one time or another. He strongly believed in the power of rehabilitation and worked to incorporate this philosophy into their policies. Using this experience he was a trusted advisor and consultant for the U.S. Department of Justice, frequently provided expert witness testimony, and taught for the Criminal Justice program at Portland Community College for over 30 years. He considered teaching to be one of the most important jobs he had ever done. He also spent 19 years in the Air Force Reserves.
Warren loved to teach, travel, and entertain guests in his home. He was an accomplished musician and had enjoyed playing with the Shrine Band. Warren will be remembered for his dedication to and love for his family, friends, and God, his unfailing kindness, and his sense of justice.

He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; son, Albert; sisters, Patti and Louise; “son,” John Kang; lifelong friends, Steve, Dana, and Piper, their spouses; nieces and nephews.

Warren would wish everyone peace, justice, and faith.
Remembrances to St. James Lutheran Church or Blanchet House.

Warren’s sister Louise Cook Jones remembers Warren

[Editor: Warren’s sister, Louise Cook Jones, sent us the following recollections of Warren.]

Here are a few remembrances of Warren:

Warren Franklin Cook grew up on Firlock Lane (now 78th Ave.) in Garden Home.

He attended Garden Home Grade School beginning in 1952, when Wayne Thurman was principal.

He played Little League baseball, excelling as catcher.

He was a Cub Scout and a Boy Scout. Warren enjoyed the special Blue and Gold dinners held in the school cafeteria.

He attended events each Saturday at the downtown Portland YMCA and enjoyed his times at Camp Collins.

He played drums and clarinet in the school band when Phil McGriff was director. Louise Gustafson was his piano teacher.

In those days, children had the run of the neighborhood, as long as they were home before dark and Warren loved to ride his bike everywhere.

He also used his bicycle for his early morning Oregonian newspaper delivery route.

His companions on Firlock Lane were Steve Hare and Arnie Poutalla.

He was a friend to the Alpenrose Dairy driver, the Miller Garbage collector, the blue van bakery delivery man, Mr. Throckmorton at the grocery store – everyone knew Warren.

He was always pleasant, happy, and helpful.

He continued with music at Beaverton High School, where he played in the band and in the orchestra and sang in the A Cappella Choir.

He was a member of the Fire Squad at Beaverton and was the football commentator.

He graduated from Beaverton in 1964 and went on to study at the University of Portland.

He was a member of the Garden Home Methodist Church youth group.

As a child Warren was one of the ringers of the historic church bell.   It was rung to call folks to worship (Warren rang it occasionally at other times too, just for fun!)

His childhood in Garden Home prepared him for the many success and accolades of his adult life and for the goodness of his character.

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The Old Market Pub and Brewery

The Old Market Pub and Brewery was opened in 1994 by Andy and Shelly Bigley at the confluence of SW Multnomah Blvd. and SW Garden Home Rd. The main building of the current pub was built in 1945 by the co-operative Garden Home Community Cannery. The building and business was purchased in 1950 by Mark and Leona Whitney, who continued the community cannery service in addition to selling produce and floral arrangements. Frank and Betty Comella opened a fruit and vegetable store here from 1978 into 1992. Andy and Shelly Bigley purchased the Old Market Pub’s building from the Comellas in 1994.

The beginning

The Bigleys started with a huge empty space with a leaking roof, hundreds of fluorescent light bulbs, inadequate bathrooms, and almost no walls and no money for renovations. They did have lots of young energy to do all their own demolition, and good friends with architectural and artist talent to help create the interesting Pub of today. They opened the Old Market Pub in 1994.

Andy Bigley had grown up in SW Portland, graduating from Lincoln High. Shelly graduated from Cleveland High on the east side. From an Oregonian story:

The Bigleys also have leaned heavily on an old adage: location, location, location. The couple opened Old Market a bit off the beaten path for a brewpub, buying a local produce market at the confluence of Southwest Portland’s Garden Home, Ashcreek and Maplewood neighborhoods.”

“They built a place that would be a consistently popular neighborhood draw for a quarter century and counting. ‘I got out of school and I didn’t want to get a real job,’ Andy says. ‘I started working for the McMenamins, and that was one of the funnest jobs I ever had. I had a great time, so I thought, ‘Well, let’s give it a shot.’”

Garden Home History artifacts on display

Thank you to Andy and Shelly Bigley for displaying the historical artifacts that Colin Lamb has so generously given us from his Garden Home Thriftway store which closed in 2019. So stop by the Old Market Pub & Brewery for maybe a Famous Reuben or possibly Mr. Toad’s Wild Red, a dark red ale. While you are there, look around the dining room to find our vintage Garden Home Post Office safe, the two large photos of the Lewis & Clark Centennial Fair of 1905, and three interesting train reliefs which remind us of our railroad history.

By Elaine Shreve, August, 2020, from interview with Shelly Bigley.

See also:

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Luke and Michelle Middlebrooks and the Oregon Electric Railroad Line

The rails and ties have been pulled up but the old railroad beds from the early 1900s have forever carved their story into Garden Home. The junction of the Garden Home Rail Station was just east of what is now the Old Market Pub on SW Multnomah Boulevard. At this Station, the first Oregon Electric trains came through Garden Home in 1908. By 1916 the single track via the Maplewood trestle was abandoned in favor of a double track from Multnomah and Portland which continued the track going west and another branch leading south through Garden Home. The west rail section is visible on the aerial views and is now known as the Fanno Creek Trail.

This story concerns the Oregon Electric railroad that separated at the junction and took a southerly route to Metzger, Tigard and eventually down the valley to Eugene. The abandoned bed for these rails is visible on our aerial maps and can be seen at SW 71st Ave where a sign cautions that this is now private property.

In 2012, Luke and Michelle Middlebrooks purchased their property at the east end of Stewart Street for their young family. This property includes about 1/8 mile of the old railroad bed. Luke and Michelle were raised in the Portland area. Michelle grew up in the John’s Landing area of SW Portland, and Luke grew up in SE Portland. They purchased their home in 2012 from the Forsman family, who had lived in it since the 1950’s. When the abandoned rail properties were parceled and sold to surrounding home owners in 1977, the Forsman family purchased a stretch and extended two of their tax lots, and created a third tax lot (the rail bed off 71st). The Middlebrooks family purchased all three lots from the Forsmans in 2012 and endeavor to eradicate the invasive blackberry and ivy

The tax parcel boundaries are documented on the 11/23/1977 survey that was commissioned by former owner Frank Forsman and plots out the monuments/markers that are the perimeter of the railroad section, and describes how they are in relation to the larger lots the Middlebrooks also own. This portion of the railroad bed is private property and is taxed accordingly.

Early photos of the home show a typical bungalow look from the front and an enlarged windowed porch in the back where a former owner raised plants.

The railroad bed visible from SW 71st up to the residence area functions as play area for the children and a wildlife corridor. It is about 20 feet wide covered with grass, with ivy up the many trees, and the occasional apple, pear, and plum trees. The railroad bed is elevated about 10-15 feet from the properties on either side as was necessary to keep the railroad at less than a 2% incline. The Oregon Electric Railroad ceased passenger service in 1933 and continued with freight business until 1944 when the rails and ties were pulled up and rail business through Garden Home ceased.

The Middlebrooks home was built in 1938 in a section platted as Blosick Acres, as noted in the attractive sign Michelle painted for their garage. The Blosick family is believed to have lived in Multnomah and were good friends with the Roshak family as noted in these 1937 snapshots from Deanne Roshak Eng.

Michelle Middlebrooks remembers that her great grandparents were married on January 1, 1917 in Lebanon, Oregon. They took the train to the Albany station where they transferred and rode from Albany to Portland. She believes that they must have been on the Oregon Electric Railway that traveled through her front yard! “So incredible to think they passed right through here!”

Story by Elaine Shreve and Michelle Middlebrooks with railroad consultation by Harold Gjerman.

To read more about the demise of the Oregon Electric Railway, see Development of SW Multnomah Boulevard.

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September 2020 Update – Garden Home History Email

Hello Garden Home History Friends,

Thank you to all of you who have responded so nicely to our monthly Updates about Garden Home history. We are grateful for your stories and photos!

Pumpkins in Garden Home: We’re hoping that your tomatoes are ripening, that you and your family are well, that children are getting ready for a creative new school year, and that everyone has had some fun this summer. Here is a wonderful front yard pumpkin patch seen in Garden Home the first of September!

Garden Home pumpkins Sep 1, 2020

Garden Home pumpkins Sep 1, 2020

Old Market Pub and Brewery: Thanks to the very generous offer from Andy and Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub to display some of our artifacts from the Garden Home Thriftway. Stop in for takeout, dine-in, a drink, some pizza, or a sandwich, and check out our two photos from the 1905 Lewis & Clark Centennial in Portland. The vintage Garden Home postal safe and the three train reliefs are also there. Stan Houseman also snagged the huge Post Office eagle and postal schedule which will go up soon. Thanks to Stan for moving this project along and to Colin Lamb for the photos and train reliefs. I wrote the histories for all of the photos and reliefs. Old Market Pub and Brewery: 6959 SW Multnomah Blvd, 503-244-2337.

Shelly Bigley in front of the Lewis and Clark Centennial photos at the Old Market Pub

Shelly Bigley in front of the Lewis and Clark Centennial photos at the Old Market Pub

Garden Home Post Office safe on display in the Old Market Pub

Garden Home Post Office safe on display in the Old Market Pub

The original Whitney's Cannery sign on display in the Old Market Pub

The original Whitney’s Cannery sign on display in the Old Market Pub

Historic Log Home Demolished: We were sorry to see the Judy George log home falling to the demolition bulldozer. This log home on SW 87th Ave. (south of Garden Home Road) was built in 1900 on what was then called Westgard Street. This modest house had been added to until it was not salvageable. The lot is being prepared for its new home.

Log house construction

New Housing Developments: You have probably noticed the two large housing developments on SW Garden Home Road. Both the Piper Ridge development at SW 87th Ave. and the Garden Home Estates between SW 81st Ave. and SW 78th Ave. will each have 9 new homes developed by Westwood Homes (plus the original homes on the respective lots). Both properties were previously large pastures with horses in the last century. Early Garden Home was platted with large lots for typical family needs such as a cow, chickens, fruit trees, pasture, and a garden.

Windmill Fun: The original windmill photo from Shirley Gertsch Bartels was so washed out that you could hardly see these two men from Shattuck Dairy having fun. Thanks to David Delgado, a new resident who offered to improve some of our vintage photos, you can enjoy the fun…and bravado…from these men!

Shattuck Dairy - showing off on windmill used to pump water - edited by David Delgado

Shattuck Dairy – showing off on windmill used to pump water – edited by David Delgado

Thriftway Opening in 1981: Thanks to Bob and Sharon Cram for sharing this flyer from 1981 and helping us to clarify the Thriftway dates. The current 1995 store building with the bell tower was added on to this 1981 building. Read the story about the history of Lamb’s Thriftway.

1981 flyer for new Thriftway

1981 flyer for new Thriftway

Have you noticed the old rail bed at SW 71st Ave.? We’re working with Michelle Middlebrooks on a new story about the southern rail line carving through Garden Home and the Middlebrooks’ property.

Middlebrooks railway bed entry at SW 71st

Middlebrooks railway bed entry at SW 71st

Thank you for your donations, and thanks to our Treasurer Marie Pacella for processing them: Marie works hard maintaining our books and our mailing database. If you want a printed hard-copy of our quarterly newsletter, you can subscribe for $10 per year (the email version is free).

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Stay safe and well,

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

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Brian Henry Bjornson obituary

Brian Henry Bjornson, October 13, 1944 to August 11, 2020

Brian Henry Bjornson

Brian Henry Bjornson

Brian H. Bjornson passed away with his wife Debbie, his son Haldan and daughter Anika at his side at their home in West Linn Aug. 11, 2020. Brian developed a disabling muscle disease and became homebound in March, 2020. Known for his self-confidence, determination and strong sense of purpose he continued to work in spite of this progressively debilitating condition. Until the end Brian was alert, able to enjoy his family, friends and be comforted by them, even working on-line with associates at Norris and Stevens.

Brian was born in Portland on October 13, 1944. He grew up in Garden Home. His father passed April 8, 1974. Brian remained very supportive and close to his mother who passed Oct. 10, 1993. Brian developed, through his loving experience with his parents, his outstanding trait of loyalty to family, friends and coworkers.

Brian attended Garden Home Grade School and Beaverton High School where he played football and baseball. He also was a member of Boy Scouts attaining the top rank of Eagle Scout. Brian took the Boy Scout Motto seriously as those of us who know him associate his strength of character with the words of that Motto. Brian’s success in Scouts likely gave him confidence that he could succeed with more serious endeavors of the future.

Following high school, Brian attended Portland State University after a brief start at Oregon State. While at PSU, Brian studied as an exchange student in Italy and Norway. He developed his love of Nordic heritage that he later shared with his family. Brian took his family on two trips to Iceland in 2007 and 2008 where they found the family farm of his great-grandfather, Thorlacker. Brian always valued his family and friendships roots.

Following college, in 1972, Brian joined Norris and Stevens, Inc. Recognizing the strength and character of the Norris and Stevens leadership team, Brian began his life-long career. He went on to found the company’s apartment brokerage and management division. Norris and Stevens, which is locally owned, grew to become one of the largest commercial real estate firms in Oregon and S.W. Washington.

In 1987, Brian became a majority owner of N & S and led the company. Brian was the current Chairman of the Board for Norris and Stevens.

When Brian had established his success in business, he was ready for a family. Brian met Debbie Trick in 1993 on a blind date and married in 1998. They were blessed with two children, Haldan currently age 20, and Anika, age 18. Brian took great joy and pride in his family and spent a lot of time traveling as a family. When the kids were very young, Brian and Debbie built a vacation home in Camp Sherman, an area of Oregon Brian had loved since his teenage years. The family spent many vacations and every Christmas in their Camp Sherman retreat.

Anika and Haldan are both college students. Like in business, Brian gave his all to equip and encourage both children to be the best they can be. His love, influence and support for them will be greatly missed.

In lieu of flowers, a baseball scholarship is being established in memory of Brian to honor his love and support of the game. An email with this and other information will be sent out in the near future. A Celebration of Life will also be announced for a later date.

Posted in Obituaries, People | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Mary Jean (Ehret) Baumhofer obituary

Mary Jean (Ehret) Baumhofer, 1931-2020

Mary Jean Ehret Baumhofer

Mary Jean (Ehret) Baumhofer

Mary Jean (Ehret) Baumhofer, 88, of Lake Oswego, Ore., passed away July 12, 2020, at Oswego Place Assisted Living with her daughters at her bedside.

She was born to the late Arthur and Mildred Ehret Oct. 22, 1931, in Centralia, Wash. Mary Jean attended Centralia Junior College and graduated with honors from Washington State University in 1953.

Mary Jean began working as a Home Economics teacher in Shelton, Wash., and was eventually certified as a media specialist, working as an elementary school librarian in the Reynolds School District in Portland, Ore. Mary Jane was instrumental in switching all of the library resources from the card catalog to digital.

She will be remembered for her love of family (and photos of them), reading, music (playing the organ and piano), knitting and her organizational skills. Mary Jane compiled databases of her prolific sheet music collection, 45s, 78s, CDs and books as well as kept track of her daily walking steps.

She knit over 75 Christmas stockings for family and friends, each personalized with their name. Mary Jane also knit prayer shawls and baby hats for charities.

She is survived by her children, Laura (Mark) Worden of Corvallis, Janet (Gary) Buskuhl of Tualatin and William ‘Scott’ Baumhofer of Portland; and three grandchildren, Daniel, Nathan and Joshua.

Mary Jane was preceded in death by her brother, William ‘Bill’ Ehret of Centralia, Wash.

She shared a special bond with her daughter, Janet and older brother, Bill, who had the same birthday.

To honor Mary Jean’s love of books and her many hours of volunteering at the library, the family requests memorial donations be made to the Garden Home Community Library, https://www.gardenhomelibrary.org/contribute.

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August 2020 News

In this edition: Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan, Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout?, Century Homes, John & Dawn, True Love, Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, and researching railroad history.

Welcome to our website about historic Garden Home. In the People and Places pages, you’ll find well over two hundred stories, and over two thousand photos of vintage Garden Home and residents attending our events. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Upcoming Events

Due to the current public health recommendations in response to the COVID-19 virus, we will not have slide programs until the Garden Home Recreation Center re-opens. We have interesting programs planned for the future. Take good care of yourselves.

New Stories

Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan

All about the DeHaan’s and other families who lived on Fanno Creek and SW 92nd Ave and worked the grounds of the Portland Golf Club down through the years, with wonderful vintage photos. See Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan.

Moving a Tree - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis and John DeHaan, moving a tree at the golf course.

Alvas Car - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis’ homemade car, pictured on his father’s farm.

Fogelbo listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Fogelbo, on Oleson Road, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Ross Fogelquist has been very generous in sharing his beautiful home with us. See Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist.

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Murals on Scotty’s Restaurant

Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout? This photo shows the back wall in 2011, we’d love to have photos of the other two murals also. We also have a 1912 B.P.O.E. postcard, courtesy of Shirley Gertsch-Bartels. The card was used to direct the order of delivered milk from the Gertsch’s Shattuck Dairy in 1912. Remember when the Elks Lodge used the upstairs over Scotty’s restaurant? We’d love to learn more about that!

Scotty's back mural

Scotty’s back mural

1912 postcard BPOE invite - front

1912 postcard BPOE invite

Century Homes research continues

We appreciate the many Century Homes that lend substance, beauty, and history to Garden Home. Stan Houseman is developing photos and lists of these homes for future documentation. In time, these home owners will be notified by mail regarding their interest to participate. We believe our oldest home was built in 1890 and we have just over 100 homes built before 1930. Please contact Stan if you have an older home or know of one in Garden Home, Housemanquality@yahoo.com.

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

John & Dawn, True Love cement mystery

When Melissa and Josh Stefanic-Grimsbo tore off the old wooden steps of their 1930s log cabin home at 8550 SW Garden Home Road, they found a cement pad with the touching John & Dawn, True Love scratched into the cement. Does anyone know who might have lived there after the 1930s?

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

Garden Home History board members at work

Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, researching railroad history, and more stories to come! Here are some Garden Home Board members at work for our community.

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway - 2020

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway – 2020

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb's Thriftway closing 2019

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb’s Thriftway closing 2019

Marie Pacella, Treasurer - 2020

Marie Pacella, Treasurer – 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask - 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask – 2020

History of the Portland Golf Club

Established in 1914, the Portland Golf Club is a prestigious private golf club in the Garden Home/Raleigh Hills area. We’ve begun collecting photos and stories about the Portland Golf Club, we hope that you’ll share your stories with us.

Portland Golf Club - original club house

The Portland Golf Club’s original clubhouse stood about where the 7th hole tee is now.

New vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery

Shelly Bigley of the Old Market Pub and Brewery provided us with a large gallery of vintage photos of Whitney’s Cannery. To view the full gallery, see our story on Mark and Leona Whitney and the Whitney Cannery, 1950-1976. Thank you, Shelly!

The Garden Home junction of the Oregon Electric Railway

Read our story on the history of the Garden Home station of the Oregon Electric Railway to view our gallery of vintage photos of the station, including 1936 aerial photos that finally put to rest the exact location of the station. On the photo below, you can clearly see the station building on a raised platform (note the shadows).

1936 Army Corps of Engineers Aerial Photo - Garden Home Railroad Station detail

1936 Army Corps of Engineers aerial photo – Garden Home Railroad Station detail

Garden Home train station - rear

Garden Home train station – rear

Garden Home train station

Garden Home train station

Get Involved

You are invited to our Board meetings which are held the second Monday of most months, 6:30 pm at the Garden Home Recreation Center. We often begin with slide show presentations. All are welcome to attend our meetings. We’re an active and fun group, we have lots of opportunities to get involved!
Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street sign

Historic Garden Home street signs: We currently have about 35 of the Historic Garden Home street sign toppers in our community. Each sign was purchased by a friend or family member to honor their loved one. Click here to view photos of the signs and for information about sponsoring a sign.

Our generous donors permit us to print and mail this newsletter ($140) for our non-e-mail people and for the Garden Home Recreation Center. We also replace the Historic Garden Home street signs once for signs that disappear, current cost for each sign, $60. With our latest order, we’ll have about 35 signs out in our neighborhoods. We also have website costs, printing, paper, plaques and many other costs of an organization. Donor names are listed on our History Bulletin Board at the Recreation Center. Thank you to all of our donors and to all of our volunteers for their time and skills.

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August 2020 Update – Garden Home History Email

Hello Garden Home History Friends,

Thank you to all of you who have responded so nicely to our monthly Updates about Garden Home history. We depend on all of you for your stories and photos! We hope you’ll enjoy the following new stories.

Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan – All about the DeHaan’s and other families who lived on Fanno Creek and SW 92nd Ave and worked the grounds of the Portland Golf Club down through the years, with wonderful vintage photos. See Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan.

Moving a Tree - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis and John DeHaan, moving a tree at the golf course.

Alvas Car - Portland Golf Club

Alva Davis’ homemade car, pictured on his father’s farm.

Fogelbo, on Oleson Road, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Ross Fogelquist has been very generous in sharing his beautiful home with us. See Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist.

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Fogelbo, home of Ross Fogelquist

Remember the exterior murals on Scotty’s restaurant prior to its purchase by the Dugout? This photo shows the back wall in 2011, we’d love to have photos of the other two murals also. We also have a 1912 B.P.O.E. postcard, courtesy of Shirley Gertsch-Bartels. The card was used to direct the order of delivered milk from the Gertsch’s Shattuck Dairy in 1912. Remember when the Elks Lodge used the upstairs over Scotty’s restaurant? We’d love to learn more about that!

Scotty's back mural

Scotty’s back mural

1912 postcard BPOE invite - front

1912 postcard BPOE invite

Century Homes: We appreciate the many older homes that lend substance, beauty, and history to Garden Home. Stan Houseman is developing photos and lists of these homes for future documentation. In time, these home owners will be notified by mail regarding their interest to participate. We believe our oldest home was built in 1890 and we have just over 100 homes built before 1930. Please contact Stan if you have an older home or know of one in Garden Home, Housemanquality@yahoo.com.

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

Stan reviewing Century Homes in Garden Home

John & Dawn, True Love: When Melissa and Josh Stefanic-Grimsbo tore off the old wooden steps of their 1930s log cabin home at 8550 SW Garden Home Road, they found a cement pad with the touching John & Dawn, True Love scratched into the cement. Does anyone know who might have lived there after the 1930s?

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

John & Dawn, True Love scratched into cement at 8550 SW Garden Home Road

Thanks to other Garden Home History friends who are writing Garden Home memoirs, improving our old photos, researching railroad history, and more stories to come! Here are some Garden Home Board members at work for our community.

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway - 2020

Susan Houseman framing the placards describing the photos and train reliefs from Lamb’s Thriftway – 2020

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb's Thriftway closing 2019

John and Marie Pacella, Bob and Sharon Cram, Lamb’s Thriftway closing 2019

Marie Pacella, Treasurer - 2020

Marie Pacella, Treasurer – 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask - 2020

Jan Fredrickson with custom mask – 2020

Read more about Garden Home with hundreds of photos and stories at GardenHomeHistory.com. We love hearing your memories about Garden Home! Let us know yours. You can contact us at GardenHomeHistory@gmail.com or call Elaine Shreve at 503-246-5879 or Esta Mapes at 503-246-5758 or Stan Houseman at 503-679-3691.

Stay safe and well,

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

Elaine Shreve

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Portland Golf Club by Joanne DeHaan

Portland Golf Club members developed and maintained the first nine holes of their golf course. But, local men, from the Garden Home area, developed the other nine holes – half of the golf course. In 1920, the golf club hired Donald Junor as the head greens-keeper. He hired a crew that included some members of my husband’s family, the DeHaans.

John R DeHaan lived on the family farm – five acres that his grandfather, Adam DeHaan, and father, John C DeHaan, had bought in 1890. The farm straddled Fanno Creek on the west side of what is now called 92nd Avenue. Alva Davis was often there, visiting with John’s sister, Dora.

John and Alva joined Donald’s crew at the Portland Golf Club. Ed and Walt Sandberg lived on Garden Home Road and Bill Rice lived nearby on what is now Marissa Drive. Over the years, they worked with John and Alva and we believe they were part of that original greens-keeper crew, too.

Alva drove his homemade car down from the Davis family farm on Mountain Home near Newberg. Then Alva and John, carrying their lunch pails, could walk the Oregon Electric Railway tracks to the golf course tool shed, near where the old club house had been.

One of the greens-keepers’ first jobs was to tackle a beaver dam that flooded a large portion of the grounds. Pulling logs and branches out of the dam had not deterred the beavers. The crew got rid of them, cleared brush, pulled out stumps with the tractor, graded the grounds, and created fairways, tees, and greens.

In 1922, John and Alva married each other’s sisters, acquired adjoining lots on the DeHaan property, and planned the homes they would build. With Alva working at the golf course, his wife, Dora DeHaan Davis, could stay near her family and Alva could work outside, as he had on his father’s farm.

The crew worked at improving the existing nine holes, too. They planted trees between the fairways, used horses to dredge out a lake on Hole 7, and reshaped its bunkers. On Hole 8, they bulldozed a hill so that players could see the flag from the tee.

Even with all their work, there was too much water around the back nine holes. Knowing these men and their personalities, the following conversation could have happened.

“Most of the tee for Hole 18 is a swamp,” Donald worried, “we need to do something about it.”

“We could fill ‘er up, raise the ground a bit,” reckoned Alva as he tapped his pipe on his heel.

John tugged on the bill of his cap. “We’d still have to deal with the water. It’s got to go somewhere.”

“Let’s bring the creek on up to it,” was Alva’s solution.

“Move the creek?” Donald wondered if they really wanted that much work.

“Yup.”

In 1925, Alva and John, along with the other workers, dug a new creek bed with a tractor and shovels. Day after day they pushed wheelbarrows full of rocks to the trench to line its banks. They stooped, crouched, and knelt in the trench to slap concrete between the rocks. And, they put that creek where it could drain the swamp.

Just like the creek, the school district line was also moved. John’s house was re-zoned into the McKay school district and that’s where his children attended school.

John and Alva continued working through the depression, earning $2.85 a day. During the winter, when there wasn’t enough greens-keeper work for both of them, they agreed to take turns working one week at a time. Since they had a cow, pig, and chickens, John and his wife, Effie Davis DeHaan, were able to sustain their family of eight through this time. Effie even fed the down-and-outers who showed up at her back door.

In November 1941, when John’s son, Virgil, was almost 17, he received a special permit to work with machinery at the golf course. He earned $.50 per hour when the minimum wage was only $.30.

After Thanksgiving, Virgil, his pa, and uncle, traveled to the Davis family farm, gathered cedar branches, and decorated the club house for the holidays. Occasionally, they needed to repair something inside the clubhouse. One day, Virgil was working inside, near the ‘Members Only’ slot machine. He had a quarter in his pocket. He kept feeling it there, burning a hole, one might say. He looked around. Pa and Uncle were busy, not watching him. He pulled that quarter out and slipped it into the slot. Pulled the handle. Rumble, clink, clank, clinkety-clank, 100 quarters dropped out of that machine.

Startled, John turned to see that Virgil was causing the commotion, “What’re you doing? You’re not supposed to be foolin’ with that.”

“I didn’t think nothing would happen,” said Virgil while he frantically grabbed at the quarters.

With a chuckle, Alva swooped his large hand under the spout and helped catch the rest of the coins. Virgil scooted after the quarters that had rolled across the floor and quickly stuffed them into his pocket. He was relieved that no club members complained.

Virgil learned to prepare the greens for the players. Donald was still head greens-keeper, but his son, Harvey, gave the instructions. “Take that hose there out to a green and drag it across to knock the dew off. Do all of them that way.”

“Can I mow when I’m done?” The fairway tractor with three reel lawn mowers out each side and one across the back was very interesting to this teenager.

“No, I want you to take the dump truck down to River Sand & Gravel.”

Virgil liked that even better. He put that Model AA in gear and took off. He hauled back a load of river silt and anticipated releasing the handle to dump the load in the work yard.

“Whoa, now, back that truck out on the fairway. Get as close to the green as you can. But don’t drive on it. Take this shovel with you,” Harvey ordered.

Virgil maneuvered that truck out to the green, shoveled silt from the bed, and shook it lightly all over the turf, filling the divot holes.

When Virgil had enough money, he bought a car. One day, a friend asked him to drive him to Portland Gas & Coke so he could apply for a job. Virgil drove him there and when he heard what jobs were available, he left the golf course and went to work at the gas company.

In 1942, John and Alva decided to help the war effort by taking more meaningful jobs. John went to work at Triangle Mills, a grain distributor, in Portland on the Willamette River. Alva became a welder in the shipyards.

By May of 1943, when Virgil was 18, he was drafted for World War II. He was sent to storm the beaches of the South Pacific. He used a caterpillar to clear out air strips so planes could bring in troops and supplies. He sometimes dodged enemy fire by hiding under, or behind, the caterpillar blade.

After the war, Virgil went back to work at Portland Gas and Coke as a pipe welder and then a foreman. Virgil retired years ago and now at 95, lives in a Beaverton senior facility. Likewise, John continued as a millwright at Triangle Mills.

Alva returned to the golf course and told John about the coming 1946 PGA Open. John rode his son’s horse, Smokey, along the old railroad tracks to Hole 15. The tracks ran much closer to the golf course than Fanno Creek Trail does now. John sat there on his horse, watching the golfers for hours. He was pleased to see Ben Hogan, the winner of that tournament.

Alva was still working at Portland Golf Club in 1950, when John’s 15 year old son, Dave (my husband) went to work at the golf course under a worker’s permit. Dave earned $1.25 per hour when the minimum wage was 75 cents.

While his uncle Alva mowed the fairways, Dave mowed greens, roughs, and the old creek banks. While mowing the creek bank that crosses Hole 12, he saw something, he thought a fly, go past his face. Soon, a worried golfer found him and was relieved that his ball had not hit him.

Dave maneuvered an older, smaller version of the above pictured fairway mower through the trees in the roughs, avoiding stray golf balls. If he hit one, he ducked, because the blades would pick it up and send it bouncing off of nearby trees. If it was close to quitting time, he’d hurry, too fast, back to the tool shed. That mower with its spiked metal wheels made a thunderous noise as he sped across the wooden bridge. And he would be reprimanded for it.

When he and a friend were sent to put weed killer on fairway 18, they mixed 1½ times the recommended dose, figuring that would do a better job. That mistake caused large brown patches in the fairway.

By the time Dave turned 16, he had earned enough to buy a ’38 Chevy.

The next summer, he worked on the night crew, watering the fairways. Arriving at work, he’d turn on the water pumps to build up pressure. One pump pulled water from the lake and the other from a well. Then he walked the roughs to find each sprinkler, drag it to a sunken faucet, screw its hose onto that faucet, and drag the sprinkler onto the fairway.  If he was lucky, when he turned the faucet on full blast, the hose wouldn’t blow out and he wouldn’t need to repair it.

Each night, he made four trips around his assigned holes, with 45 to 50 sprinklers to position on each trip. When he made his second trip, it would be dark. He used a kerosene lantern, set on the ground, to show him which direction the sprinkler was currently shooting. Moving into the back side of a sprinkler, he’d grab the vane so that it shot away from him, and dragged it to the next location. The first setting had been near the edge of the fairway. This time he’d set it straight out from the faucet. The next time around, he’d move it back against the edge on the far side of the faucet – the settings creating a fan shape.

And, on his last trip, he’d turn off all of the sprinklers and hide them in the rough, out of sight of the golfers.

He sometimes saw men down by the lake with flashlights, looking for golf balls. He knew they weren’t allowed there. But, alone in the dark, he didn’t confront them. One time he even gave permission. As he neared the lake between fairways 7 and 11, he saw a shape growing larger and larger. He stopped in his tracks. A man popped out from behind a bush and asked, “Would you mind if I got some golf balls out of the lake?”

Shaken, Dave replied, “I don’t give a damn, you can take the whole lake.”

Other nights he’d see people over by Hole 18 sweeping the ground with dim flashlights, collecting night crawlers for their next fishing expedition.

After Dave returned from serving with the Army in Korea, he and I married, and in 1962 we bought a house on Mayo Street, off Oleson Road. Our children attended Garden Home School, just like their grandfather, John DeHaan. And, our son, like his father and grandfather, wanted to work at the golf club. Harvey Junor was still there as head greens-keeper. So, when Randy applied to work at the golf course, the family name got him the interview. But, to get the job, he had to prove that he wanted to work there by asking for it a second time.

As before, the pay was still significantly above the minimum wage. He passed the word to friends from Garden Home. Steve Vale was one of them that worked with him. Steve and Randy were interested in flying. They saved their earnings for flying lessons.

Since we had moved closer to the golf club, near Jamieson Road, Randy rode his bicycle to arrive at work by 5:30 am. On a typical day, before the golfers arrived, the crew steered self-propelled reel mowers across the greens. During the rest of the day, they might spray weeds, paint sheds, trim bushes, take the weed-eater to tall grass around the lake, top-dress greens, cut sod to replace divots on tees, aerate fairways, or shovel sand into the traps and rake them smooth. They had only three Cushman carts to deliver the workers from job to job. So, they piled on where they could.

And, they considered the area from the eleventh tee to the tool shed as a race track of sorts, often coming down the hill and around the corner on two wheels.

Randy spent several weeks repairing the creek banks, the ones his Grandpa John and Uncle Alva had constructed so many years ago. Wearing hip waders, he walked through the creek to knock out loose concrete, mix new, and trowel it in between the rocks. Another friend, Dave Stephens, worked with him on this project and liked to catch the crawdads from the creek and put them on someone’s neck or in their face.

Dave Stephens recalls that all of them used to pick up apples along the fifth fairway, stash them in their carts, and throw them at each other whenever they were close enough. Eventually, this jokester got serious. He turned greens-keeping into a career, and is now the superintendent at a golf club in southern Oregon.

Randy didn’t work nights watering the fairways like his dad had, because by then the club had an automated sprinkler system. If something needed hand watering, he’d use a quick coupler to hook up hoses. And sometimes, he drove the Old Ford tractor pulling a water tank to water trees. He saw Nancy Lopez play in the 1979 LPGA tournament.

Randy and Steve, remain close friends. Randy is a retired Air Traffic Controller and is currently advising the company that is re-writing ATC training manuals and procedures. Steve is still with the FAA and was recently promoted from his position as head Air Traffic Controller of the tower at the Seattle-Tacoma Airport to general manager of the entire region.

Dave had a career as a truck mechanic and shop foreman at a shop for Kenworth trucks. He advised me on much of this story. We now live in Beaverton.

Most of these men took advantage of the one-night-a-week, free golfing for greens-keepers. But they were not invited inside the clubhouse.  Years later, our daughter, Anita, was on the staff of a private school and was an invited guest at that school’s four annual fund-raising events at the Portland Golf Club.

[Editor: read more about the history of the Portland Golf Club.]

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